US Press: pick of the papers

The ten must-read opinion pieces from today's US papers.

1. Public turns against war on pot (Chicago Tribune)

The stupidity and futility of the federal war on weed has slowly permeated the mass consciousness, writes Steve Chapman.

2. No Peace for Prisoners (Washington Post)

The Israeli-Palestinian prisoner swap offers little new hope for peace, writes this editorial.

3. Occupy the Classroom (New York Times)

Want to close the equality gap? Providing early childhood education would be a great place to start, and it might even pay for itself, says Nicholas D. Kristof.

4. Re-examining our bio-defense (Politico)

According to Jeffrey Runge, Congress needs to take a fresh look as it prepares to reauthorize BARDA.

5. How to Clean Up the Housing Mess (Wall Street Journal) ($)

Millions of foreclosures are ruining millions of lives. We can do better than Social Darwinism, says Alan Blinder.

6. A shortage of drugs in a free market? (USA Today)

This editorial reporst that while the FDA and pharmaceutical industry debate the hows and whys, patients are stuck in limbo with life-threatening illnesses.

7. Candidate Cain disrespects African-American community (Detroit Free Press)

Trevor Coleman writes: "Imagine the reaction if a white presidential candidate said most African Americans have been "brainwashed" to vote for Democrats."

8. Meet Me at the Plaza (New York Times)

A 50-year-old bargain between the city and private developers gave New York hundreds of potentially useful spaces, but Jerold S. Kayden argues it clearly needs revising.

9. Obama in the Occupy Wall Street camp (Los Angeles Times)

With polls showing broad support for the movement, President Obama tries to turn the anger into an electoral advantage, says Doyle McManus.

10. Newt's surge (Washington Times)

The Republican party's disarray benefits the former speaker, writes Brett M. Decker -- and starts talk of a Gingrich-Palin ticket.

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Listen up, Enda Kenny: why two Irish women are livetweeting their trip for an abortion

With abortion illegal in the Republic of Ireland, many women must travel to Britain to obtain the procedure. One woman, and her friend, are documenting the journey.

An Irish woman and her friend are live-tweeting their journey to Manchester to procure an abortion.

Using the handle @twowomentravel, the pair are documenting each stage of their trip online, from an early flight to the clinic waiting room. Each tweet includes the handle @endakennyTD, tagging in the Taoiseach.

The 8th amendment of the Irish constitution criminalises abortion in the Republic of Ireland, including in cases of rape. Women who wish to access the procedure must either do so illegally – using, for instance, pills acquired online or by post – or travel to a country where abortion is legal.

As the 1967 Abortion Act is not in place in Northern Ireland, Irish women often travel to the UK mainland, especially if seeking a surgical abortion. Figures show that in 2014, an average of ten women a day made the trip. The same year, 1017 abortion pills were seized by Irish customs.

Women who undertake the journey do so at a substantial cost. Aside from the cost of travel, they must pay for the procedure itself: a private abortion in England can cost over £500, and Irish women, including those born and resident in Northern Ireland, are not eligible for NHS treatment. Overnight accommodation may also need to be arranged.

The earlier an abortion is obtained, the easier the procedure. Yet many women are forced to delay while they obtain funds, or borrow money to pay for the trip. 

Women’s charity and abortion providers Marie Stopes provide specific advice for the flight back which reveals the increased health risks Irish women are exposed to. The stigma surrounding termination may also dissuade women from seeking help if complications arise once they have arrived home.

Abortion is a relatively minor procedure in medical terms. A recent survey quoted in Time magazine suggests that 95% of women who have had an abortion say they do not regret it.

It is not surprising, then, that calls to repeal the 8th amendment are increasing in volume. Campaigns like the Artists’ Campaign to Repeal the 8th (to which this author is a signatory) as well as the Abortion Rights Campaign and REPEAL have mobilised to lobby for a change in the law, and in some cases help fund women forced to travel.

Women’s testimony is an important part of campaigning. Abortion is stigmatised across these isles, but the criminal aspect in Ireland makes the experience of abortion particularly difficult to discuss. Actions like @twowomentravel and groups such as the X-ile Project, which photographs women who have had the procedure, help to normalise abortion, showing a part of life often hidden from view (but which plenty of women experience).

The hope is that Irish women will soon be able to access abortions which are like those available to women in England: free, safe, and legal.

The Abortion Support Network help pay for women from the island of Ireland access abortion. Their fundraising page is here.

Stephanie Boland is digital assistant at the New Statesman. She tweets at @stephanieboland