US Press: pick of the papers

The ten must-read opinion pieces from today's US papers.

1. Putting Chicago into detox (Chicago Tribune)

For aldermen addicted to binge spending, former White House chief of staff Mayor Rahm Emanuel's rigorous budget is one step toward recovery.

2. Tied up in knots (Washington Post)

What's the GOP's favorite solution? asks E.J. Dionne. Doing nothing.

3. How to Stop the Drop in Home Values (New York Times)

The only real solution to plummeting home values is to permanently reduce the mortgage debt hanging over America, writes Martin S. Feldstein.

4. Education: Too much testing? (Los Angeles Times)

This editorial argues that Gov. Jerry Brown was wrong to veto SB 547, but he made important points about the love of learning.

5. The price of privacy (Boston Globe)

Juliette Kayyem asks: What's in a name? When it's an FBI source, quite a lot. The BG, its competitors, readers, and a lot of media critics are now arguing over the Globe's decision to report the name of the tipster who led the FBI to fugitive James "Whitey'' Bulger.

6. Can Occupy Wall Street give progressives a lift? (Washington Post)

OWS must raise the consciousness of backsliding congressional Democrats who have decided that, unlike the president, they do not believe that "the rich" begin at household incomes of $250,000, says George F. Will.

7. Henninger: The Unsinkable Mitt Romney (Wall Street Journal)

According to Danniel Henninger, this candidate will have to be pushed a lot harder to make him a good president.

8. Pop goes the bubble of Obama's phantom green jobs (San Francisco Chronicle)

Before the Senate failed to pass his American Jobs Act Tuesday, President Obama made a last-ditch speech to talk up his troubled bill. But not once did Obama mention "green jobs" - his erstwhile jobs of the future, Debra J. Saunders reminds readers.

9. Life-and-death power of AIDS funding (Politico)

Elton John and Senator Bill Nelson pen an op-ed, arguing that reducing the medication offered by government assistance programs is shortsighted.

10. Fight ban on single-sex schools (USA Today)

Christina Hoff Sommers feels that eight misguided academics are meddling with public education.

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Stephen Hawking's enthusiasm for colonising space makes him almost as bad as Trump

The physicist's inistence on mankind's expansion risks making him a handmaiden of inequality.

“Spreading out may be the only thing that saves us from ourselves,” Stephen Hawking has warned. And he’s not just talking about surviving the UK's recent run of record breaking heat. If humanity doesn’t start sending people to Mars soon, then in a few hundred years he says we can all expect to be kaput; there just isn’t enough space for us all.

The theoretical physicist gave his address to the glittering Starmus Festival of science and arts in Norway. According to the BBC, he argued that climate change and the depletion of natural resources help make space travel essential. With this in mind, he would like to see a mission to Mars by 2025 and a new lunar base within 30 years.

He even took a swipe at Donald Trump: “I am not denying the importance of fighting climate change and global warming, unlike Donald Trump, who may just have taken the most serious, and wrong, decision on climate change this world has seen.”

Yet there are striking similarities between Hawking's statement and the President's bombast. For one thing there was the context in which it was made - an address to a festival dripping with conspicuous consumption, where 18 carat gold OMEGA watches were dished out as prizes.

More importantly there's the inescapable reality that space colonisation is an inherently elitist affair: under Trump you may be able to pay your way out of earthly catastrophe, while for Elon Musk, brawn could be a deciding advantage, given he wants his early settlers on Mars to be able to dredge up buried ice.

Whichever way you divide it up, it is unlikely that everyone will be able to RightMove their way to a less crowded galaxy. Hell, most people can’t even make it to Starmus itself (€800  for a full price ticket), where the line-up of speakers is overwhelmingly white and male.

So while this obsession with space travel has a certain nobility, it also risks elevating earthly inequalities to an interplanetary scale.

And although Hawking is right to call out Trump on climate change, the concern that space travel diverts money from saving earth's ecosystems still stands. 

In a context where the American government is upping NASA’s budget for manned space flights at the same time as it cuts funds for critical work observing the changes on earth, it is imperative that the wider science community stands up against this worrying trend.

Hawking's enthusiasm for colonising the solar system risks playing into the hands of the those who share the President destructive views on the climate, at the expense of the planet underneath us.

India Bourke is an environment writer and editorial assistant at the New Statesman.

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