US Press: pick of the papers

The ten must-read opinion pieces from today's US papers.

1. Tea Party on the left? (Washington Post)

Liberals can help show that Obama is a centrist, says E. J. Dionne.

2. Watch out for Putin, and Russia (Los Angeles Times)

The country is headed for a dead end, says Leon Aron, as it seems likely Vladimir Putin will regain the presidency. The U.S. should be prepared for that.

3. Florida Republicans for Obama (Wall Street Journal)

Elites try to truncate the presidential primary contests, writes this editorial.

4. Insurers aren't playing fair (Philadelphia Inquirer)

Health insurance companies appear to be ratcheting up premiums to pad their profits before more elements of the federal health-care reform kick in, says this editorial.

5. The University of Wherever (New York Times)

Bill Keller asks: Can technology provide an elite education for the masses?

6. On gay marriage, state is out of step (Star Tribune)

Under the laws that apply to everyone, Minnesota's GLBT couples deserve the same rights as every other American, states this editorial.

7. Health care reforms are working (St. Petersburg Times)

Health insurance security for young adults has markedly increased. The Supreme Court should uphold the law and let the reforms continue, argues this editorial.

8. Adults Dither as Schools, Unions Fail Children (Roll Call)

Dismal news about U.S. public education keeps tumbling in, but Congress seems unable to act, writes Morton M. Kondracke. Republican presidential candidates, too, seem determined to have America keep slipping behind the rest of the world.

9. Public burned by solar loans (Boston Globe)

If private sector funding is available, the government should get out of the way; if not, there's no reason taxpayers should take the risk, argues John E. Sununu.

10. Midwest turns against Obama (Washington Times)

One of the most important facts to remember heading into the election year, says Brett M. Decker, is that President Obama could not even defend his own Senate seat in 2010.

Photo: Getty
Show Hide image

What does François Bayrou's endorsement of Emmanuel Macron mean for the French presidential race?

The support of the perennial candidate for President will boost Macron's morale but won't transform his electoral standing. 

François Bayrou, the leader of the centrist Democratic Movement and a candidate for the French presidency in 2007 and 2012, has endorsed Emmanuel Macron’s bid for the presidency.

What does it mean for the presidential race?  Under the rules of the French electoral system, if no candidate secures more than half the vote in the first round, the top two go through to a run-off.

Since 2013, Marine Le Pen has consistently led in the first round before going down to defeat in the second, regardless of the identity of her opponents, according to the polls.

However, national crises – such as terror attacks or the recent riots following the brutal arrest of a 22-year-old black man, who was sodomised with a police baton – do result in a boost for Le Pen’s standing, as does the ongoing “Penelopegate” scandal about the finances of the centre-right candidate, François Fillon.

Macron performs the most strongly of any candidate in the second round but struggles to make it into the top two in the first. Having eked out a clear lead in second place ahead of Fillon in the wake of Penelopegate, Macron’s lead has fallen back in recent polls after he said that France’s rule in Algeria was a “crime against humanity”.

Although polls show that the lion’s share of Bayrou’s supporters flow to Macron without his presence in the race, with the rest going to Fillon and Le Pen, Macron’s standing has remained unchanged regardless of whether or not Bayrou is in the race or not. So as far as the electoral battlefield is concerned, Bayrou’s decision is not a gamechanger.

But the institutional support of the Democratic Movement will add to the ability of Macron’s new party, En Marche, to get its voters to the polls on election day, though the Democratic Movement has never won a vast number of deputies or regional elections. It will further add to the good news for Macron following a successful visit to London this week, and, his supporters will hope, will transform the mood music around his campaign.

But hopes that a similar pact between Benoît Hamon, the Socialist Party candidate, and Jean-Luc Jean-Luc Mélenchon, the Left Front’s candidate, look increasingly slim, after Mélenchon said that joining up with the Socialists would be like “hanging himself to a hearse”. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to British politics.