US Press: pick of the papers

The ten must-read opinion pieces from today's US papers.

1. Steve Jobs' passing is a sad milestone (Mercury News)

This editorial from the Silicon Valley paper pays tribute to the late Apple co-founder.

2. Elizabeth Warren and liberalism, twisting the 'social contract' (Washington Post)

George F. Will explains why Warren is wrong.

3. Palin was right to forgo 2012 presidential run (Washington Examiner)

This editorial writes that it is time for Republicans to snap out of it, stop pining for a knight on a white horse and choose a nominee from among the candidates already in the race.

4. No to the Keystone XL pipeline (Los Angeles Times)

The jobs crisis is not an excuse for bad policy, say Sean Sweeney and Bill McKibben.

5. Who will be the GOP messiah? (Politico)

The Poll Gods are wrong, writes Roger Smith: Obama is the favourite.

6. Where's the Jobs Bill? (New York Times)

Congressional Democrats need to stop cowering and admit that higher taxes are necessary to revive the economy, and vote for the jobs plan, argues this NYT editorial.

7. Inside D.C.'s gun registry (Washington Times)

The D.C. Gun Registry office is not where you go for help getting a legal gun, writes Emily Miller: It's where you go to get more confused by bureaucracy.

8. Cell phone tells life story that should stay private (Chicago Sun Times)

Privacy laws in the United States need an upgrade, says this editorial.

9. For soldiers, the enemy may be themselves (Boston Globe)

The most dangerous year to be a soldier is the first year, and, as evidenced in a recent Army report, that has nothing to do with the Taliban, Iraqi insurgents, or poor training, writes Juliette Kayyem.

10. Teacher tests church vs. state (USA Today)

This editorial asks: What happens when a church, acting in a secular matter, tries to deprive someone's rights?

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What can you do about Europe's refugee crisis?

The death of a three-year-old boy on a beach in Europe has stirred Britain's conscience. What can you do to help stop the deaths?

The ongoing refugee crisis in the Mediterranean dominates this morning’s front pages. Photographs of the body of a small boy, Aylan Kurdi, who washed up on a beach, have stunned many into calling for action to help those fleeing persecution and conflict, both through offering shelter and in tackling the problem at root. 

The deaths are the result of ongoing turmoil in Syria and its surrounding countries, forcing people to cross the Med in makeshift boats – for the most part, those boats are anything from DIY rafts to glorified lilos.

What can you do about it?
Firstly, don’t despair. Don’t let the near-silence of David Cameron – usually, if nothing else, a depressingly good barometer of public sentiment – fool you into thinking that the British people is uniformly against taking more refugees. (I say “more” although “some” would be a better word – Britain has resettled just 216 Syrian refugees since the war there began.)

A survey by the political scientist Rob Ford in March found a clear majority – 47 per cent to 24 per cent – in favour of taking more refugees. Along with Maria Sobolewska, Ford has set up a Facebook group coordinating the various humanitarian efforts and campaigns to do more for Britain’s refugees, which you can join here.

Save the Children – whose campaign director, Kirsty McNeill, has written for the Staggers before on the causes of the crisis – have a petition that you can sign here, and the charity will be contacting signatories to do more over the coming days. Or take part in Refugee Action's 2,000 Flowers campaign: all you need is a camera-phone.

You can also give - to the UN's refugee agency here, and to MOAS (Migrant Offshore Aid Station), or to the Red Cross.

And a government petition, which you can sign here, could get the death toll debated in Parliament. 

 

Stephen Bush is editor of the Staggers, the New Statesman’s political blog.