US Press: pick of the papers

The ten must-read opinion pieces from today's US papers

1. The Lost Decade? (New York Times)

Insular thinking and rigid ideas are holding the United States back from productive engagement with its most important problems, says David Brooks.

2. Immigration rhetoric ignores trends (USA Today)

The crackdown on illegal immigration is disconnected from reality and already producing unintended consequences, argues this editorial.

3. Republicans playing politics with disaster relief (St. Petersburg Times)

Providing fellow citizens with a safe place to sleep, clean water and other basics should not be held hostage to a political circus, says this editorial.

4. A bear of a problem for Obama (Los Angeles Times)

Obama has angered America's silent majority, says Jonah Goldberg, and his base is not happy with him either.

5. Even the Muppets know America needs science (Chicago Sun Times)

With Bachmann's latest comments on medical vaccines, Sesame Street's science agenda couldn't come at a better time, says this editorial.

6. Why Christie should run for President (Washington Post)

Rick Perry's recent stumbles have re-started speculation that New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie might re-think his "no-go" decision. Chris Cillizza lists the three reasons for him -- and three against.

7. Everyone's a Little Bit Racist (Wall Street Journal)

Even the first black president, says James Taranto -- to hear Maxine Waters tell it.

8. The genius of Vladimir Putin (Washington Post)

He is a great czar, if not a great man, argues Ralph Peters.

9. The Chris Christie infatuation (Washington Times)

Fundraising tour stokes hope that N.J. governor will run for president, writes Emily Miller.

10. Rick Perry is making me swoon (New York Daily News)

Richard Cohen explains why he can't help liking the "big Texas lug".

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Britain is running out of allies as it squares up to Russia

For whatever reason, Donald Trump is going to be no friend of an anti-Russia foreign policy.

The row over Donald Trump and that dossier rumbles on.

Nothing puts legs on a story like a domestic angle, and that the retired spy who compiled the file is a one of our own has excited Britain’s headline writers. The man in question, Christopher Steele, has gone to ground having told his neighbour to look after his cats before vanishing.

Although the dossier contains known errors, Steele is regarded in the intelligence community as a serious operator not known for passing on unsubstantiated rumours, which is one reason why American intelligence is investigating the claims.

“Britain's role in Trump dossier” is the Telegraph’s splash, “The ‘credible’ ex-MI6 man behind Trump Russia report” is the Guardian’s angle, “British spy in hiding” is the i’s splash.

But it’s not only British headline writers who are exercised by Mr Steele; the Russian government is too. “MI6 officers are never ex,” the Russian Embassy tweeted, accusing the UK of “briefing both ways - against Russia and US President”. “Kremlin blames Britain for Trump sex storm” is the Mail’s splash.

Elsewhere, Crispin Blunt, the chair of the Foreign Affairs Select Committee, warns that relations between the United Kingdom and Russia are as “bad as they can get” in peacetime.

Though much of the coverage of the Trump dossier has focused on the eyecatching claims about whether or not the President-Elect was caught in a Russian honeytrap, the important thing, as I said yesterday, is that the man who is seven days from becoming President of the United States, whether through inclination or intimidation, is not going to be a reliable friend of the United Kingdom against Russia.

Though Emanuel Macron might just sneak into the second round of the French presidency, it still looks likely that the final choice for French voters will be an all-Russia affair, between Francois Fillon and Marine Le Pen.

For one reason or another, Britain’s stand against Russia looks likely to be very lonely indeed.

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to British politics.