US Press: pick of the papers

The ten must-read opinion pieces from today's US papers.

1. The wrong help for the unemployed (Chicago Tribune)

One provision in the American Jobs Act may have a positive impact on hiring, says Steve Chapman. Just not in America.

2. GM is back, thanks to Uncle Sam (Washington Post)

E.J. Dionne Jr writes that one of the Obama administration's most successful programs is also its most "socialist".

3. Taxes, the Deficit and the Economy (New York Times)

President Obama's tax proposals are fair and based on sound economics, says this editorial.

4. Mandate health insurance (USA Today)

This editorial notes that GOP candidates should remember personal responsibility originally was a Republican idea.

5. Iraq, minus U.S. troops (Los Angeles Times)

Leaving more than a residual U.S. force in Iraq after this year would prolong the problem, says this editorial.

6. The one-sentence blunder (Boston Globe)

Juliette Kayemm warns that by adopting the Israeli government's terminology, the US convinced Abbas that it could no longer be trusted as anagent for bilateral talks.

7. Peace Now, or Never (New York Times)

This is the last chance for the two-state solution, says former Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Olmert. Israel's leaders must focus on making tough decisions, not their political survival.

8. How Republicans are rigging the next election (Star Tribune)

This should not be the way to win the White House, says Harold Meyerson.

9. Why Ron Paul is winning the GOP primary (Washington Post)

Even though he won't be president or the nominee, the veteran is ahead of the game, argues Dana Millbank.

10. Pity the 'super committee' (Boston Globe)

Congress' 'super committee' faces a nearly impossible task in trimming the federal budget gap by $1.2 trillion, says Doyle McManus.

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Will anyone sing for the Brexiters?

The five acts booked to perform at pro-Brexit music festival Bpop Live are down to one.

Do Brexiters like music too? If the lineup of Bpoplive (or more accurately: “Brexit Live presents: Bpop Live”) is anything to go by, the answer is no. Ok, former lineup.

The anti-Europe rally-cum-music festival has already been postponed once, after the drum and bass duo Sigma cancelled saying they “weren’t told Bpoplive was a political event”.

But then earlier this week the party was back on, set for Sunday 19 June, 4 days before the referendum, and a week before Glastonbury, saving music lovers a difficult dilemma. The new lineup had just 5 acts: the 90s boybands East17 and 5ive, Alesha Dixon of Britain’s Got Talent and Strictly Come Dancing fame, family act Sister Sledge and Gwen Dickey of Rose Royce.

Unfortunately for those who have already shelled out £23 for a ticket, that 5 is now down to 1. First to pull out were 5ive, who told the Mirror that “as a band [they] have no political allegiances or opinions for either side.” Instead, they said, their “allegiance is first and foremost to their fans” - all 4our of them.

Next to drop was Alesha Dixon, whose spokesperson said that she decided to withdraw when it became clear that the event was to be “more of a political rally with entertainment included” than “a multi-artist pop concert in a fantastic venue in the heart of the UK”. Some reports suggested she was wary of sharing a platform with Nigel Farage, though she has no qualms about sitting behind a big desk with Simon Cowell.

A spokesperson for Sister Sledge then told Political Scrapbook that they had left the Brexit family too, swiftly followed by East 17 who decided not to stay another day.

So, it’s down to Gwen Dickey.

Dickey seems as yet disinclined to exit the Brexit stage, telling the Mirror: "I am not allowed to get into political matters in this lovely country and vote. It is not allowed as a American citizen living here. I have enough going on in my head and heart regarding matters in my own country at this time. Who will be the next President of the USA is of greater concern to me and for you?"

With the event in flux, it doesn’t look like the tickets are selling quickly.

In February, as David Cameron’s EU renegotiation floundered, the Daily Mail ran a front-page editorial asking “Who will speak for England?” Watch out for tomorrow’s update: “Who will sing for the Brexiters?”

I'm a mole, innit.