US Press: pick of the papers

The ten must-read opinion pieces from today's US papers.

1. How 9/11 changed religion in America (USA Today)

Politicians must display their Christian credentials, says Stephen Prothero, and for many, Islam is the sworn enemy.

2. The President's Do-Over (New York Times)

Ross Douthat outlines the first-term agenda that should have been.

3. How much has Obama learned? (Washington Post)

Obama must stick with an analysis of the nature of our political fight that sees it as it is, not as he wishes it were, says E J Dionne Jr.

4. Perry, Romney and Social Security (Wall Street Journal)

Amid their high-flying rhetoric, neither candidate is helping the cause of reform, says this editorial.

5. Social Security far from a 'Ponzi scheme' (USA Today)

This editorial mounts a staunch defence of social security. Elsewhere in the paper, Rick Perry reiterates his views on the matter.

6. As the boomers turn (Los Angeles Times)

Karlyn Bowman and Andrew Rugg suggest that if more boomers are led to embrace the GOP, it could affect the 2012 vote.

7. A bad but realistic decision on EPA (Star Tribune)

Obama was forced to stand down on new clean-air standards by the GOP and the faltering economy, says this editorial.

8. The GOP's immigration nonsense (Washington Post)

This editorial is critical of the Republican candidates for dodging the facts at last week's debate.

9. An Impeccable Disaster (New York Times)

The moralizers, who hate the idea of letting nations off the hook for alleged fiscal sins, are sending the euro over the edge, says Paul Krugman.

10. Government static disrupts a phone connection (Chicago Tribune)

This editorial argues that the FCC and the US Department of Justice need to help AT&T and T-Mobile merge.

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“Trembling, shaking / Oh, my heart is aching”: the EU out campaign song will give you chills

But not in a good way.

You know the story. Some old guys with vague dreams of empire want Britain to leave the European Union. They’ve been kicking up such a big fuss over the past few years that the government is letting the public decide.

And what is it that sways a largely politically indifferent electorate? Strikes hope in their hearts for a mildly less bureaucratic yet dangerously human rights-free future? An anthem, of course!

Originally by Carly You’re so Vain Simon, this is the song the Leave.EU campaign (Nigel Farage’s chosen group) has chosen. It is performed by the singer Antonia Suñer, for whom freedom from the technofederalists couldn’t come any suñer.

Here are the lyrics, of which your mole has done a close reading. But essentially it’s just nature imagery with fascist undertones and some heartburn.

"Let the river run

"Let all the dreamers

"Wake the nation.

"Come, the new Jerusalem."

Don’t use a river metaphor in anything political, unless you actively want to evoke Enoch Powell. Also, Jerusalem? That’s a bit... strong, isn’t it? Heavy connotations of being a little bit too Englandy.

"Silver cities rise,

"The morning lights,

"The streets that meet them,

"And sirens call them on

"With a song."

Sirens and streets. Doesn’t sound like a wholly un-authoritarian view of the UK’s EU-free future to me.

"It’s asking for the taking,

"Trembling, shaking,

"Oh, my heart is aching."

A reference to the elderly nature of many of the UK’s eurosceptics, perhaps?

"We’re coming to the edge,

"Running on the water,

"Coming through the fog,

"Your sons and daughters."

I feel like this is something to do with the hosepipe ban.

"We the great and small,

"Stand on a star,

"And blaze a trail of desire,

"Through the dark’ning dawn."

Everyone will have to speak this kind of English in the new Jerusalem, m'lady, oft with shorten’d words which will leave you feeling cringéd.

"It’s asking for the taking.

"Come run with me now,

"The sky is the colour of blue,

"You’ve never even seen,

"In the eyes of your lover."

I think this means: no one has ever loved anyone with the same colour eyes as the EU flag.

I'm a mole, innit.