Should society let uninsured people die? "YEAH!"

Crowd at Monday night's Republican presidential debate cheer at suggestion that society should allow

 

Once again, one of the most memorable moments in Monday's CNN Republican presidential debate came from the audience. Hot on the heels of jubilant cheers at Rick Perry's record number of executions as Texas governor in last week's debate, some members of the audience cheered at the suggestion that society should allow uninsured Americans to die.

The host Wolf Blitzer was pushing candidate Ron Paul about a hypothetical man without insurance who goes into a coma. "That's what's freedom is all about," replied Paul. "Are you saying society should just let him die?" asked Blizter -- at which point several members of the Tea Part-heavy audience interrupted with "YEAH!"

None of the candidates took issue with the cheers, although it has been reported that Perry said he was "taken aback" by the response, adding "we are the party of life".

Samira Shackle is a freelance journalist, who tweets @samirashackle. She was formerly a staff writer for the New Statesman.

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Cabinet audit: what does the appointment of Liam Fox as International Trade Secretary mean for policy?

The political and policy-based implications of the new Secretary of State for International Trade.

Only Nixon, it is said, could have gone to China. Only a politician with the impeccable Commie-bashing credentials of the 37th President had the political capital necessary to strike a deal with the People’s Republic of China.

Theresa May’s great hope is that only Liam Fox, the newly-installed Secretary of State for International Trade, has the Euro-bashing credentials to break the news to the Brexiteers that a deal between a post-Leave United Kingdom and China might be somewhat harder to negotiate than Vote Leave suggested.

The biggest item on the agenda: striking a deal that allows Britain to stay in the single market. Elsewhere, Fox should use his political capital with the Conservative right to wait longer to sign deals than a Remainer would have to, to avoid the United Kingdom being caught in a series of bad deals. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. He usually writes about politics.