Beltway Briefing

The top stories from US politics today.

1. Michele Bachmann has released the first election advert of her campaign. In it she plays Bachmann Bingo, reeling off the Bachmann facts that are almost mandatory for any report on the Minnesotan congresswoman. Five kids? Check. 23 foster kids? Check. Tax lawyer? Check. It does have a jaunty soundtrack though.

 

2. Barack Obama's polling numbers were flat during June according to the latest Gallup poll, as the sheen from killing Bin Laden wears off and the US's stagnant economy takes its toll on voters.

Barack Obama June 2011 poll numbers. 

3. Obama met with leaders from Congress for a debt summit in the White House today, with the aim of raising the US debt ceiling to prevent a potential default - the dealine for which is 2 August. Obama is expected to propose cutting the country's deficit by up to $4tr (£2.5tr) over a decade. The US currently runs an estimated $1.5 trillion (£932 billion) annual budget deficit.

4.Mitt Romney enjoyed some facetime with David Cameron today, according to his Twitter account. The PM appeared anxious not to be seen with the Repbulican Romney, and did not make a song and dance about the visit. Perhaps he is still mindful of the distatse triggered in some quarters by photos of Cameron and John McCain in 2008. Whether this one will prove as embarassing remains to be seen.

David Cameron with Mitt Romney 

Getty Images.
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How will Labour handle the Trident vote?

Shadow cabinet ministers have been promised a free vote and dismiss suggestions that the party should abstain. 

At some point this year MPs will vote on whether Trident should be renewed. It is politics, rather than policy, that will likely determine the timing. With Labour more divided on the nuclear question than any other, the Tories aim to inflict maximum damage on the opposition. Some want an early vote in order to wreak havoc ahead of the May elections, while others suggest waiting until autumn in the hope that the unilateralist Jeremy Corbyn may have changed party policy by then.  

Urged at PMQs by Conservative defence select committee chair Julian Lewis to "do the statesmanlike thing" and hold the vote "as soon as possible", Cameron replied: "We should have the vote when we need to have the vote and that is exactly what we will do" - a reply that does little to settle the matter. 

As I've reported before, frontbenchers have been privately assured by Corbyn that they and other Labour MPs will have a free vote on the issue. Just seven of the shadow cabinet's 31 members support unilateral disarmament, with Tom Watson, Andy Burnham, Hilary Benn and Angela Eagle among those committed to Trident renewal. But interviewed on the Today programme yesterday, after her gruelling PLP appearance, Emily Thornberry suggested that Labour may advise MPs to abstain. Noting that there was no legal requirement for the Commons to vote on the decision (and that MPs did so in 2007), she denounced the Tories for "playing games". But the possibility that Labour could ignore the vote was described to me by one shadow cabinet member as "madness". He warned that Labour would appear entirely unfit to govern if it abstained on a matter of national security. 

But with Trident renewal a fait accompli, owing to the Conservatives' majority, the real battle is to determine Labour's stance at the next election. Sources on both sides are doubtful that Corbyn will have the support required to change policy at the party conference, with the trade unions, including the pro-Trident Unite and GMB, holding 50 per cent of the vote. And Trident supporters also speak of their success against the left in constituency delegate elections. One described the Corbyn-aligned Momentum as a "clickocracy" that ultimately failed to turn out when required. 

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.