Beltway Briefing

The top stories from US politics today.

1. Michele Bachmann has released the first election advert of her campaign. In it she plays Bachmann Bingo, reeling off the Bachmann facts that are almost mandatory for any report on the Minnesotan congresswoman. Five kids? Check. 23 foster kids? Check. Tax lawyer? Check. It does have a jaunty soundtrack though.


2. Barack Obama's polling numbers were flat during June according to the latest Gallup poll, as the sheen from killing Bin Laden wears off and the US's stagnant economy takes its toll on voters.

Barack Obama June 2011 poll numbers. 

3. Obama met with leaders from Congress for a debt summit in the White House today, with the aim of raising the US debt ceiling to prevent a potential default - the dealine for which is 2 August. Obama is expected to propose cutting the country's deficit by up to $4tr (£2.5tr) over a decade. The US currently runs an estimated $1.5 trillion (£932 billion) annual budget deficit.

4.Mitt Romney enjoyed some facetime with David Cameron today, according to his Twitter account. The PM appeared anxious not to be seen with the Repbulican Romney, and did not make a song and dance about the visit. Perhaps he is still mindful of the distatse triggered in some quarters by photos of Cameron and John McCain in 2008. Whether this one will prove as embarassing remains to be seen.

David Cameron with Mitt Romney 

Photo: Getty Images
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The buck doesn't stop with Grant Shapps - and probably shouldn't stop with Lord Feldman, either

The question of "who knew what, and when?" shouldn't stop with the Conservative peer.

If Grant Shapps’ enforced resignation as a minister was intended to draw a line under the Mark Clarke affair, it has had the reverse effect. Attention is now shifting to Lord Feldman, who was joint chair during Shapps’  tenure at the top of CCHQ.  It is not just the allegations of sexual harrassment, bullying, and extortion against Mark Clarke, but the question of who knew what, and when.

Although Shapps’ resignation letter says that “the buck” stops with him, his allies are privately furious at his de facto sacking, and they are pointing the finger at Feldman. They point out that not only was Feldman the senior partner on paper, but when the rewards for the unexpected election victory were handed out, it was Feldman who was held up as the key man, while Shapps was given what they see as a relatively lowly position in the Department for International Development.  Yet Feldman is still in post while Shapps was effectively forced out by David Cameron. Once again, says one, “the PM’s mates are protected, the rest of us shafted”.

As Simon Walters reports in this morning’s Mail on Sunday, the focus is turning onto Feldman, while Paul Goodman, the editor of the influential grassroots website ConservativeHome has piled further pressure on the peer by calling for him to go.

But even Feldman’s resignation is unlikely to be the end of the matter. Although the scope of the allegations against Clarke were unknown to many, questions about his behaviour were widespread, and fears about the conduct of elections in the party’s youth wing are also longstanding. Shortly after the 2010 election, Conservative student activists told me they’d cheered when Sadiq Khan defeated Clarke in Tooting, while a group of Conservative staffers were said to be part of the “Six per cent club” – they wanted a swing big enough for a Tory majority, but too small for Clarke to win his seat. The viciousness of Conservative Future’s internal elections is sufficiently well-known, meanwhile, to be a repeated refrain among defenders of the notoriously opaque democratic process in Labour Students, with supporters of a one member one vote system asked if they would risk elections as vicious as those in their Tory equivalent.

Just as it seems unlikely that Feldman remained ignorant of allegations against Clarke if Shapps knew, it feels untenable to argue that Clarke’s defeat could be cheered by both student Conservatives and Tory staffers and the unpleasantness of the party’s internal election sufficiently well-known by its opponents, without coming across the desk of Conservative politicians above even the chair of CCHQ’s paygrade.

Stephen Bush is editor of the Staggers, the New Statesman’s political blog.