Beltway Briefing

The top five stories from US politics today.

 

1. Sarah Palin was in Iowa today -- not for electioneering, but for the premiere of Undefeated, a new documentary about her. Outside the Pella Opera House, she refused to elaborate on her daughter's statement on Fox and Friends yesterday that her mother had "definitely" made up her mind about whether she will run.

"What exactly did Bristol say?" she said. "I texted Bristol, I said 'What did you say this morning, honey?' What I told Bristol, too, I said, 'What is talked about on the fishing boat stays on the fishing boat.'"

She also said that she is "not ready to announce anything yet" about a possible candidacy.

2. Speculation continues, too, about the intentions of Texas Governor Rick Perry. He will be in California this week, holding private meetings with Republican leaders, potential fundraisers and legislators.

Tomorrow morning, he will meet with business leaders in Beverly Hills, a city which is a rich source of campaign funding. Later, he will meet with GOP leaders in Newport Beach, before meeting Republican legislators in Sacramento.

While a spokesman says that the trip has nothing to do with the 2012 campaign, this programme of meetings appears to say otherwise.

3. Michele Bachmann has styled herself "American Girl" of the presidential race, as the grassroots Tea Party candidate, and used the 1977 hit song at the end of two speeches this week in Waterloo, Iowa, where she formally kicked off her campaign. But if reports are to be believed, she won't be able to use it as her theme for long. According to the Los Angeles Times, Tom Petty has told Bachmann that he doesn't want her to use his song at campaign events.

She is not alone -- Petty was also reported to refuse George W Bush's request to use his song "I Won't Back Down". If you are still in any doubt about the singer's political orientation, Hillary Clinton used "American Girl" at events when she was running for the Democratic nomination in 2008. Petty did not object.

4. The Democratic super PAC Priorities USA launched a television advert today in Colorado, Florida, Iowa, North Carolina and Virginia (states thought to be competitive in the next election), rebutting claims made in an ad by Crossroads GPS, an independent conservative group founded by Karl Rove.

The $5m Crossroads ad -- released on Monday -- blamed President Barack Obama for the unemployment rate, national debt, and high gas prices.

The Priorities USA ad, which by contrast cost in the region of $750,000, calls this "politics at its worst".

5. Herman Cain, the Republican presidential candidate, will publish a book detailing his life and career as the former CEO of Godfather's Pizza.

The memoir will be called Who is Herman Cain? and is set for release in October.

A statement released by the publisher said:

The recent Republican debate in New Hampshire introduced Herman Cain as a Presidential candidate, yet little is known about his impressive background. A proud 'outsider' in the political arena, Cain created his name in corporate America rather than on Capitol Hill, through four decades spent revitalizing business in the private sector.

Unfortunately, he is still polling in low single-digit numbers, though.

Samira Shackle is a freelance journalist, who tweets @samirashackle. She was formerly a staff writer for the New Statesman.

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Britain is running out of allies as it squares up to Russia

For whatever reason, Donald Trump is going to be no friend of an anti-Russia foreign policy.

The row over Donald Trump and that dossier rumbles on.

Nothing puts legs on a story like a domestic angle, and that the retired spy who compiled the file is a one of our own has excited Britain’s headline writers. The man in question, Christopher Steele, has gone to ground having told his neighbour to look after his cats before vanishing.

Although the dossier contains known errors, Steele is regarded in the intelligence community as a serious operator not known for passing on unsubstantiated rumours, which is one reason why American intelligence is investigating the claims.

“Britain's role in Trump dossier” is the Telegraph’s splash, “The ‘credible’ ex-MI6 man behind Trump Russia report” is the Guardian’s angle, “British spy in hiding” is the i’s splash.

But it’s not only British headline writers who are exercised by Mr Steele; the Russian government is too. “MI6 officers are never ex,” the Russian Embassy tweeted, accusing the UK of “briefing both ways - against Russia and US President”. “Kremlin blames Britain for Trump sex storm” is the Mail’s splash.

Elsewhere, Crispin Blunt, the chair of the Foreign Affairs Select Committee, warns that relations between the United Kingdom and Russia are as “bad as they can get” in peacetime.

Though much of the coverage of the Trump dossier has focused on the eyecatching claims about whether or not the President-Elect was caught in a Russian honeytrap, the important thing, as I said yesterday, is that the man who is seven days from becoming President of the United States, whether through inclination or intimidation, is not going to be a reliable friend of the United Kingdom against Russia.

Though Emanuel Macron might just sneak into the second round of the French presidency, it still looks likely that the final choice for French voters will be an all-Russia affair, between Francois Fillon and Marine Le Pen.

For one reason or another, Britain’s stand against Russia looks likely to be very lonely indeed.

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to British politics.