How Sarah Palin left her fans hanging

So what's the story? Has Palin decided against a presidential run after all?

Oh dear. Remember that much-reported bus tour which Sarah Palin began with such a blaze of hoopla, less than a month ago? The PAC-funded One Nation tour , complete with a special "We the People" slogan adorning her luxury coach, all set to travel round historic moments -- and battleground states, natch -- across the land?

Now it seems talk of a nationwide sweep may have been exaggerated. The tour, which had reporters all confused about its route from the start, now seems to have come to an unheralded stop, with no word on whether it'll resume.

The Palin family have headed back to Alaska, annoying thousands of frustrated fans who'd hoped to catch a glimpse of their political idol.

So what's the story? Has Palin decided against a presidential run after all? Or is she taking time out to prepare for some kind of formal announcement? As usual she's managing to hog the headlines, either way.

Meanwhile her 20-year-old daughter Bristol is hogging some headlines of her own with the launch of her autobiography. Yes, that's right -- the Dancing with the Stars finalist has produced a memoir detailing her ill-fated love affair with Levi Johnston whose own autobiography is out later this year, in case you're interested.

There's clearly no love lost between the pair nowadays: in Not Afraid of Life Ms Palin describes him variously as a "gnat" , "cocky" and "obnoxious"

Some wags are already calling the book the start of the Bristol for President campaign.

And just when you thought it was safe to go back to Alaska....

Felicity Spector is a deputy programme editor for Channel 4 News.

 

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Will anyone sing for the Brexiters?

The five acts booked to perform at pro-Brexit music festival Bpop Live are down to one.

Do Brexiters like music too? If the lineup of Bpoplive (or more accurately: “Brexit Live presents: Bpop Live”) is anything to go by, the answer is no. Ok, former lineup.

The anti-Europe rally-cum-music festival has already been postponed once, after the drum and bass duo Sigma cancelled saying they “weren’t told Bpoplive was a political event”.

But then earlier this week the party was back on, set for Sunday 19 June, 4 days before the referendum, and a week before Glastonbury, saving music lovers a difficult dilemma. The new lineup had just 5 acts: the 90s boybands East17 and 5ive, Alesha Dixon of Britain’s Got Talent and Strictly Come Dancing fame, family act Sister Sledge and Gwen Dickey of Rose Royce.

Unfortunately for those who have already shelled out £23 for a ticket, that 5 is now down to 1. First to pull out were 5ive, who told the Mirror that “as a band [they] have no political allegiances or opinions for either side.” Instead, they said, their “allegiance is first and foremost to their fans”. All 4our of them.

Next to drop was Alesha Dixon, whose spokesperson said that that she decided to withdraw when it became clear that the event was to be “more of a political rally with entertainment included” than “a multi-artist pop concert in a fantastic venue in the heart of the UK”. Some reports suggested she was wary of sharing a platform with Nigel Farage, though she has no qualms about sitting behind a big desk with Simon Cowell

A spokesperson for Sister Sledge then told Political Scrapbook that they had left the Brexit family too, swiftly followed by East 17 who decided not to stay another day.

So, it’s down to Gwen Dickey.

Dickey seems as yet disinclined to exit the Brexit stage, telling the Mirror: "I am not allowed to get into political matters in this lovely country and vote. It is not allowed as a American citizen living here. I have enough going on in my head and heart regarding matters in my own country at this time. Who will be the next President of the USA is of greater concern to me and for you?"

With the event in flux, it doesn’t look like the tickets are selling quickly.

In February, as David Cameron’s EU renegotiation floundered, the Daily Mail ran a front-page editorial asking “Who will speak for England?” Watch out for tomorrow’s update: “Who will sing for the Brexiters?”

I'm a mole, innit.