How Sarah Palin left her fans hanging

So what's the story? Has Palin decided against a presidential run after all?

Oh dear. Remember that much-reported bus tour which Sarah Palin began with such a blaze of hoopla, less than a month ago? The PAC-funded One Nation tour , complete with a special "We the People" slogan adorning her luxury coach, all set to travel round historic moments -- and battleground states, natch -- across the land?

Now it seems talk of a nationwide sweep may have been exaggerated. The tour, which had reporters all confused about its route from the start, now seems to have come to an unheralded stop, with no word on whether it'll resume.

The Palin family have headed back to Alaska, annoying thousands of frustrated fans who'd hoped to catch a glimpse of their political idol.

So what's the story? Has Palin decided against a presidential run after all? Or is she taking time out to prepare for some kind of formal announcement? As usual she's managing to hog the headlines, either way.

Meanwhile her 20-year-old daughter Bristol is hogging some headlines of her own with the launch of her autobiography. Yes, that's right -- the Dancing with the Stars finalist has produced a memoir detailing her ill-fated love affair with Levi Johnston whose own autobiography is out later this year, in case you're interested.

There's clearly no love lost between the pair nowadays: in Not Afraid of Life Ms Palin describes him variously as a "gnat" , "cocky" and "obnoxious"

Some wags are already calling the book the start of the Bristol for President campaign.

And just when you thought it was safe to go back to Alaska....

Felicity Spector is a deputy programme editor for Channel 4 News.

 

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When Donald Trump talks, remember that Donald Trump almost always lies

Anyone getting excited about a trade deal between the United States and the United Kingdom should pay more attention to what Trump does, not what he says. 

Celebrations all round at the Times, which has bagged the first British newspaper interview with President-Elect Donald Trump.

Here are the headlines: he’s said that the EU has become a “vehicle for Germany”, that Nato is “obsolete” as it hasn’t focused on the big issue of the time (tackling Islamic terrorism), and that he expects that other countries will join the United Kingdom in leaving the European Union.

But what will trigger celebrations outside of the News Building is that Trump has this to say about a US-UK trade deal: his administration will ““work very hard to get it done quickly and done properly”. Time for champagne at Downing Street?

When reading or listening to an interview with Donald Trump, don’t forget that this is the man who has lied about, among other things, who really paid for gifts to charity on Celebrity Apprentice, being named Michigan’s Man of the Year in 2011, and making Mexico pay for a border wall between it and the United States. So take everything he promises with an ocean’s worth of salt, and instead look at what he does.   

Remember that in the same interview, the President-Elect threatened to hit BMW with sanctions over its decision to put a factory in Mexico, not the United States. More importantly, look at the people he is appointing to fill key trade posts: they are not free traders or anything like it. Anyone waiting for a Trump-backed trade deal that is “good for the UK” will wait a long time.

And as chess champion turned Putin-critic-in-chief Garry Kasparov notes on Twitter, it’s worth noting that Trump’s remarks on foreign affairs are near-identical to Putin’s. The idea that Nato’s traditional purpose is obsolete and that the focus should be on Islamic terrorism, meanwhile, will come as a shock to the Baltic states, and indeed, to the 650 British soldiers who have been sent to Estonia and Poland as part of a Nato deployment to deter Russian aggression against those countries.

All in all, I wouldn’t start declaring the new President is good news for the UK just yet.

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to British politics.