US politics from outside the beltway

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Beltway Briefing

The top five stories from US politics today.

1. Mitt Romney will travel to Pennsylvania today -- the same as President Barack Obama -- in a clear attempt to cement his position as the frontrunner in the Republican presidential field.

The former Massachusetts governor will attack Obama's economic record, by holding a press conference outside Allentown Metal Works, a closed down factory which Obama visited in 2009 while promoting his stimulus pacakge.

Romney also released a new web video today which contrasts Obama's visit to the plant with local media reports of its closure. It uses his tagline -- borrowed from the Tories in 1979 -- "Obama isn't working".

 

 

Meanwhile, Obama will attend two fundraisers for the Democratic National Committee during his visit. Voters in Pennsylvania appear to be quite equally split on the president -- according to a recent Quinnipiac University poll, 48 per cent approve of his performance as president, while 48 per cent disapprove.

2. Republican voters are not satisfied with any of the current presidential field, if the latest poll by the New York Times/CBS is to be believed. So far, nine candidates have put themselves forward. About 70 per cent of Republican voters said they wished there were more candidates, with only 23 per cent expressing satisfaction with the current field.

Asked to name a presidential candidate they were enthusiastic about, two-thirds of GOP voters said they were not excited by any of them. Mitt Romney and Michele Bachmann fared best, each named by 7 per cent.

However, it is not all bad news for the Republican cohort -- past example indicates that these numbers will increase as the primaries approach. Before the last election, polls showed a similar lack of interest.

3. The former president Bill Clinton shared his thoughts on the current field of GOP candidates -- with the big caveat that he will be "very surprised" if Obama is not re-elected.

Of the former Utah governor Jon Huntsman, he said:

[He] did a very nice, a good job for America as ambassador to China. I think he's quite an impressive man. He's got an impressive family. I had the honor of meeting one of his children once and having a conversation with her. I think that he's refreshingly, kind of, unhide-bound. Just comes across as non-ideological -- conservative, but non-ideological, practical."

He was more reserved in his assessment of former Massachusetts governor Mitt Romney and current frontrunner:

[He] doing a better job as a candidate this time than he did four years ago. [He] comes across as more relaxed and more convicted about what he did do, less willing to just be forced into apologizing for it because it violates some part of his party orthodoxy.

And he said that the early success of Michele Bachmann, Minnesota Representative, he said:

I've been watching her speak at some of these conventions on ESPN, you know, she comes across as a real person. ... The story that they tell is pretty compelling, all those foster children she's taken in, and children she's raised and the work she's done.

4. Herman Cain's latest campaign video appears to owe more than a little something to the Fox News school of thought. As one blogger puts it: "this video proves beyond ANY doubt Obama is a Leftist Marxist".

 

5. There is no rest for the wicked. Senator Harry Reid announced today that the Senate will sacrifice its scheduled week long break for the week of 4 July so that it can continue work on cutting the deficit. "It is often said that with liberty comes responsibility," said Reid, Democratic Senator of Nevada. "We should take responsibility seriously. I'm confident we do. That's why the Senate will reconvene on Tuesday, the day after the Fourth. We'll do that because we have work to do."

This follows calls by Republicans yesterday to postpone the recess. Republicans and the Democrats are trying to reach a deal on raising the government's current $14.3 trillion debt ceiling by the start of August.