Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Ed Miliband has got answers, so stop asking the wrong questions (Guardian)

The leader's biggest task will be to tackle the despairing belief most British people have that nothing will ever really change, writes Jackie Ashley.

2. Tories still have a trump card: Ed Miliband (Financial Times)

Leader ratings are not always decisive but they matter, says Paul Goodman.

3. The PM can rise above the battle of the tiddlers (Times) (£)

Both Labour and the Tories are in trouble, writes Tim Montgomerie. Much will depend on staving off the Lib Dems and UKIP respectively.

4. Whatever happened to the Labour Party? (Independent)

The party must offer a coherent alternative that defends those it was founded to represent, says Owen Jones.

5. Obama will need more than luck (Financial Times)

If he returns to the White House, the president will face a daunting second term, writes Edward Luce.

6. Why Andrew Mitchell shouldn't be too confident (Daily Mail)

Cameron may have given the chief whip the kiss of death, writes Andrew Pierce.

7. Cardboard man is dead. Now let's redefine masculinity (Guardian)

A new book is right to highlight the identity crisis caused by economic change, writes John Harris. But where's the manifesto for a new man?

8. Unions have a gun to his head (Sun)

As long as union dinosaurs such as McCluskey call the tune, Labour is irrelevant, pointless and doomed, says Trevor Kavanagh.

9. How the public lost its appetite for breakfast telly (Independent)

It used to set the rhythm of the daily news cycle, writes Ian Burrell. But now lifestyles have changed, and with them the way we consume our media.

10. What China could learn from Romney and Obama (Guardian)

The rise and fall of Bo Xilai shows that the country's approach to leadership change is still lacking, says Jonathan Fenby.

Show Hide image

Casting the Brexit movie that is definitely real and will totally happen

Details are yet unclear as to whether The Bad Boys of Brexit will be gracing our screens, or just Farage's vivid imagination.

Hollywood is planning to take on the farcical antics of Nigel Farage et al during the UK referendum, according to rumours (some suspect planted by a starstruck Brexiteer). 

Details are yet unclear as to whether The Bad Boys of Brexit will be gracing our big or small screens, a DVD, or just Farage's vivid imagination, but either way here are our picks for casting the Hollywood adaptation.

Nigel Farage: Jim Carrey

The 2018 return of Alan Partridge as "the voice of hard Brexit" makes Steve Coogan the obvious choice. Yet Carrey's portrayal of the laughable yet pure evil Count Olaf in A Series of Unfortunate Events makes him a serious contender for this role. 

Boris Johnson: Gerard Depardieu

Stick a blonde wig on him and the French acting royalty is almost the spitting image of our own European aristocrat. He has also evidently already mastered the look of pure shock necessary for the final scene of the movie - in which the Leave campaign is victorious.

Arron Banks: Ricky Gervais

Ricky Gervais not only resembles Ukip donor Arron Banks, but has a signature shifty face perfect for the scene where the other Brexiteers ask him what is the actual plan. 

Gerry Gunster: Anthony Lapaglia

The Bad Boys of Brexit will reportedly be told from the perspective of the US strategist turned Brexit referendum expert Gerry Gunster. Thanks to recurring roles in both the comedy stalwart Frasier, and the US crime drama Without a Trace, Anthony Lapaglia is versatile enough to do funny as well as serious, a perfect mix for a story that lurches from tragedy to farce. Also, they have the same cunning eyes.

Douglas Carswell: Mark Gatiss

The resemblance is uncanny.

David Cameron: Andrew Scott

Andrew Scott is widely known for his portrayal of Moriarty in Sherlock, where he indulges in elaborate, but nationally destructive strategy games. The actor also excels in a look of misplaced confidence that David Cameron wore all the way up to the referendum. Not to mention, his forehead is just as shiny. He'll have to drink a lot of Bollinger to gain that Cameron-esque puppy fat though. 

Kate Hoey: Judi Dench

Although this casting would ruin the image of the much beloved national treasure that is Judi Dench, if anyone can pull off being the face of Labour Leave, the incredible actress can.