Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Ed Miliband has got answers, so stop asking the wrong questions (Guardian)

The leader's biggest task will be to tackle the despairing belief most British people have that nothing will ever really change, writes Jackie Ashley.

2. Tories still have a trump card: Ed Miliband (Financial Times)

Leader ratings are not always decisive but they matter, says Paul Goodman.

3. The PM can rise above the battle of the tiddlers (Times) (£)

Both Labour and the Tories are in trouble, writes Tim Montgomerie. Much will depend on staving off the Lib Dems and UKIP respectively.

4. Whatever happened to the Labour Party? (Independent)

The party must offer a coherent alternative that defends those it was founded to represent, says Owen Jones.

5. Obama will need more than luck (Financial Times)

If he returns to the White House, the president will face a daunting second term, writes Edward Luce.

6. Why Andrew Mitchell shouldn't be too confident (Daily Mail)

Cameron may have given the chief whip the kiss of death, writes Andrew Pierce.

7. Cardboard man is dead. Now let's redefine masculinity (Guardian)

A new book is right to highlight the identity crisis caused by economic change, writes John Harris. But where's the manifesto for a new man?

8. Unions have a gun to his head (Sun)

As long as union dinosaurs such as McCluskey call the tune, Labour is irrelevant, pointless and doomed, says Trevor Kavanagh.

9. How the public lost its appetite for breakfast telly (Independent)

It used to set the rhythm of the daily news cycle, writes Ian Burrell. But now lifestyles have changed, and with them the way we consume our media.

10. What China could learn from Romney and Obama (Guardian)

The rise and fall of Bo Xilai shows that the country's approach to leadership change is still lacking, says Jonathan Fenby.

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Andy Burnham's full speech on attack: "Manchester is waking up to the most difficult of dawns"

"We are grieving today, but we are strong."

Following Monday night's terror attack on an Ariana Grande concert at the Manchester Arena, newly elected mayor of the city Andy Burnham, gave a speech outside Manchester Town Hall on Tuesday morning, the full text of which is below: 

After our darkest of nights, Manchester is today waking up to the most difficult of dawns. 

It’s hard to believe what has happened here in the last few hours and to put into words the shock, anger and hurt that we feel today.

These were children, young people and their families that those responsible chose to terrorise and kill.

This was an evil act. Our first thoughts are with the families of those killed and injured. And we will do whatever we can to support them.

We are grieving today, but we are strong. Today it will be business as usual as far as possible in our great city.

I want to thank the hundreds of police, fire and ambulance staff who worked throughout the night in the most difficult circumstances imaginable.

We have had messages of support from cities around the country and across the world, and we want to thank them for that.

But lastly I wanted to thank the people of Manchester. Even in the minute after the attack, they opened their doors to strangers and drove them away from danger.

They gave the best possible immediate response to those who seek to divide us and it will be that spirit of Manchester that will prevail and hold us together.

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