The New Statesman’s rolling politics blog

RSS

Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

New Statesman

1. David Cameron won’t win an election by adopting the politics of fear (Daily Telegraph)

The Prime Minister must distil from a mish-mash of Tory policies a vision to unite the country, writes Mary Riddell.

2. Lessons from history on public debt (Financial Times)

Fiscal austerity and efforts to lower wages break societies, governments and even states, warns Martin Wolf.

3. Burglars are already bashable (Independent)

With so much already in place, Grayling's initiative looks little more than a conference crowd-pleaser, says an Independent leader.

4. We need an iconoclast to lead the Bank of England (Guardian)

Central bankers are acting like allied commanders at the Battle of the Somme, writes Simon Jenkins. Adair Turner would be a breath of fresh air.

5. Colonoscopy: the way to see today’s politics (Times) (£)

In the same way patients forget pain, voters forget the bad times if the economy improves before an election, says Daniel Finkelstein.

6. Don't trust this X Factor showman with your wife or your wallet, let alone your country (Daily Mail)

Boris Johnson is not a man to believe in, to trust or respect, says Max Hastings.

7. Hooray for Boris, a one-man opposition (Financial Times)

London’s Tory mayor might be a gift to Labour, writes Denis MacShane.

 8. The Chávez victory will be felt far beyond Latin America (Guardian)

Popular support for Venezuela's revolution shows the growing space for genuine alternatives in the 21st century, says Seumas Milne.

9. A return to policing before the days of Z Cars (Daily Telegraph)

After half a century of central control, police commissioners will give power back to the people, writes Philip Johnston.

10. Conservative conference: a mix of rage and reason (Guardian)

Tory law and order conference speeches were once greeted with howls to bring back hanging, says a Guardian editorial. How times have changed.