Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Tories ache for a hero and they think it's Boris (Independent)

The Conservatives still await their modernising moment, writes Steve Richards.

2. For these one-term Tories a shrunken state is the prize (Guardian)

Devil-may-care Osborne cuts with an eye to his ideological legacy, while growth evaporates and misery flourishes, writes Polly Toynbee.

3. The knives were out for Osborne – but he may well have saved his reputation (Daily Telegraph)

The Chancellor made a critical decision to speak sombrely about the considerable difficulties the country faces, says Benedict Brogan.

4. We demonise Chavez for his challenge to our western dogma (Independent)

Critics should stop pretending he’s a dictator, says Owen Jones. He won fair and square.

5. Cameron must shape his European policy (Financial Times)

The Prime Minister must not bend to eurosceptics, who unrealistically want the best of both worlds, says Janan Ganesh.

6. From New Delhi to Westminster, governments are cavalier about the poor (Guardian)

We should stop generalising about the poor, whether in India or Britain, and start listening to them, says Aditya Chakrabortty.

7. To win, David Cameron must try a little tenderness (Times) (£)

Husky hugger or bovver boy? The Prime Minister must resist those urging him to adopt a negative strategy, says Rachel Sylvester.

8. George Osborne: a diminished chancellor (Guardian)

Five years of blood, sweat, toil and tears were enough to see Winston Churchill routed at the ballot box in 1945, notes a Guardian leader. George Osborne is no Winston Churchill.

9. Spoken like a true Tory, Mr Osborne (Daily Mail)

George Osborne made the speech he ought to have delivered 30 months ago, says a Daily Mail leader.

10. The Brics have taken an unhappy turn (Financial Times)

The new marks of Bric status are a weakening economy and political dysfunction, writes Gideon Rachman.

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Lord Sainsbury pulls funding from Progress and other political causes

The longstanding Labour donor will no longer fund party political causes. 

Centrist Labour MPs face a funding gap for their ideas after the longstanding Labour donor Lord Sainsbury announced he will stop financing party political causes.

Sainsbury, who served as a New Labour minister and also donated to the Liberal Democrats, is instead concentrating on charitable causes. 

Lord Sainsbury funded the centrist organisation Progress, dubbed the “original Blairite pressure group”, which was founded in mid Nineties and provided the intellectual underpinnings of New Labour.

The former supermarket boss is understood to still fund Policy Network, an international thinktank headed by New Labour veteran Peter Mandelson.

He has also funded the Remain campaign group Britain Stronger in Europe. The latter reinvented itself as Open Britain after the Leave vote, and has campaigned for a softer Brexit. Its supporters include former Lib Dem leader Nick Clegg and Labour's Chuka Umunna, and it now relies on grassroots funding.

Sainsbury said he wished to “hand the baton on to a new generation of donors” who supported progressive politics. 

Progress director Richard Angell said: “Progress is extremely grateful to Lord Sainsbury for the funding he has provided for over two decades. We always knew it would not last forever.”

The organisation has raised a third of its funding target from other donors, but is now appealing for financial support from Labour supporters. Its aims include “stopping a hard-left take over” of the Labour party and “renewing the ideas of the centre-left”. 

Julia Rampen is the digital news editor of the New Statesman (previously editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog). She has also been deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines. 

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