Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Tories ache for a hero and they think it's Boris (Independent)

The Conservatives still await their modernising moment, writes Steve Richards.

2. For these one-term Tories a shrunken state is the prize (Guardian)

Devil-may-care Osborne cuts with an eye to his ideological legacy, while growth evaporates and misery flourishes, writes Polly Toynbee.

3. The knives were out for Osborne – but he may well have saved his reputation (Daily Telegraph)

The Chancellor made a critical decision to speak sombrely about the considerable difficulties the country faces, says Benedict Brogan.

4. We demonise Chavez for his challenge to our western dogma (Independent)

Critics should stop pretending he’s a dictator, says Owen Jones. He won fair and square.

5. Cameron must shape his European policy (Financial Times)

The Prime Minister must not bend to eurosceptics, who unrealistically want the best of both worlds, says Janan Ganesh.

6. From New Delhi to Westminster, governments are cavalier about the poor (Guardian)

We should stop generalising about the poor, whether in India or Britain, and start listening to them, says Aditya Chakrabortty.

7. To win, David Cameron must try a little tenderness (Times) (£)

Husky hugger or bovver boy? The Prime Minister must resist those urging him to adopt a negative strategy, says Rachel Sylvester.

8. George Osborne: a diminished chancellor (Guardian)

Five years of blood, sweat, toil and tears were enough to see Winston Churchill routed at the ballot box in 1945, notes a Guardian leader. George Osborne is no Winston Churchill.

9. Spoken like a true Tory, Mr Osborne (Daily Mail)

George Osborne made the speech he ought to have delivered 30 months ago, says a Daily Mail leader.

10. The Brics have taken an unhappy turn (Financial Times)

The new marks of Bric status are a weakening economy and political dysfunction, writes Gideon Rachman.

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What will Labour's new awkward squad do next?

What does the future hold for the party's once-rising-stars?

For years, Jeremy Corbyn was John McDonnell’s only friend in Parliament. Now, Corbyn is the twice-elected Labour leader, and McDonnell his shadow chancellor. The crushing leadership election victory has confirmed Corbyn-supporting MPs as the new Labour elite. It has also created a new awkward squad.   

Some MPs – including some vocal critics of Corbyn – are queuing up to get back in the shadow cabinet (one, Sarah Champion, returned during the leadership contest). Chi Onwurah, who spoke out on Corbyn’s management style, never left. But others, most notably the challenger Owen Smith, are resigning themselves to life on the back benches. 

So what is a once-rising-star MP to do? The most obvious choice is to throw yourself into the issue the Corbyn leadership doesn’t want to talk about – Brexit. The most obvious platform to do so on is a select committee. Chuka Umunna has founded Vote Leave Watch, a campaign group, and is running to replace Keith Vaz on the Home Affairs elect committee. Emma Reynolds, a former shadow Europe minister, is running alongside Hilary Benn to sit on the newly-created Brexit committee. 

Then there is the written word - so long as what you write is controversial enough. Rachel Reeves caused a stir when she described control on freedom of movement as “a red line” in Brexit negotiations. Keir Starmer is still planning to publish his long-scheduled immigration report. Alison McGovern embarked on a similar tour of the country

Other MPs have thrown themselves into campaigns, most notably refugee rights. Stella Creasy is working with Alf Dubs on his amendment to protect child refugees. Yvette Cooper chairs Labour's refugee taskforce.

The debate about whether Labour MPs should split altogether is ongoing, but the warnings of history aside, some Corbyn critics believe this is exactly what the leadership would like them to do. Richard Angell, deputy director of Progress, a centrist group, said: “Parts of the Labour project get very frustrated that good people Labour activists are staying in the party.”

One reason to stay in Labour is the promise of a return of shadow cabinet elections, a decision currently languishing with the National Executive Committee. 

But anti-Corbyn MPs may still yet find their ability to influence policies blocked. Even if the decision goes ahead, the Corbyn leadership is understood to be planning a root and branch reform of party institutions, to be announced in the late autumn. If it is consistent with his previous rhetoric, it will hand more power to the pro-Corbyn grassroots members. The members of Labour's new awkward squad have seized on elections as a way to legitimise their voices. But with Corbyn in charge, they might get more democracy than they bargained for.