Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Barack Obama and David Cameron are now both on the back foot (Guardian)

After Ed Miliband and Mitt Romney's surprise performances, the incumbents are under intense pressure to hit back soon, writes Jonathan Freedland.

2. David Cameron may not like it, but he’s been hit by a hurricane (Daily Telegraph)

The Prime Minister must convince Tories, as Mrs Thatcher did, that the recovery is his personal mission, says Charles Moore.

3. To know the beast you must face it in its lair (Times) (£)

They say party conferences are irrelevant, writes Matthew Parris. But this is where future leaders are forged and reveal their true nature

4. Osborne endures in hope of vindication (Financial Times)

The chancellor is biding his time as an election approaches, writes Janan Ganesh.

5. The Conservatives can be the new workers' party (Guardian)

For the Tories to gain a majority, David Cameron must push for blue-collar modernisation and a war on joblessness, says Neil O'Brien.

6. How Mr Cameron could win the next election (Daily Mail)

An unequivocal pledge to hold an in-out EU referendum would give the Tories a chance of winning a majority, says Simon Heffer.

7. Ed Miliband's One Nation conference speech was political transvestism at its most stylish (Independent)

Anyone half-worth electing has stolen their opponents' clothes, but for transvestism not to collapse into drag, it must be sustained and convincing, says Chris Bryant.

8. Maria Miller, a very modern feminist? Don't make me laugh (Guardian)

The minister for women lacks the courage to be pro-life, but can't understand why less privileged women choose abortion, writes Tanya Gold.

9. The Tories must prove they are willing to fight (Daily Telegraph)

As they gather in Birmingham for this year’s conference, the Tories need to recapture the spirit of 2007, says a Telegraph leader.

10. Impenitent Marxist and free thinker (Financial Times)

Hobsbawm was beloved even of those who do not share his politics, says Christopher Caldwell.

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Peter Mandelson: I pray every day for an early election to end Labour's awful state

The Prince of Darkness is not happy. 

Peter Mandelson prays every morning for an early general election to deal the "awful" situation in the Labour party, he has revealed.

When asked about the likelihood of a snap election, the Labour grandee told an audience at the Royal Television Society "bring it on". 

According to The Guardian, he added: "I get up every day and pray that will be the case."

Mandelson also criticised politicians of all parties for "running scared" of freedom of movement to the point they could sacrifice the economy. 

The former European trade commissioner said Brexit would be "the most complex policy exercise mounted in peace time". 

Known as "The Prince of Darkness" for his mastery of political spin, Mandelson was an architect of New Labour and has long been a Europhile.

In August, he accused the Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn of sabotaging the attempt to stay in the EU.