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Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

New Statesman

1. George Osborne's strategic mind? Long may it continue to whirr (Guardian)

As the Tories gather for their crisis conference, their plans to win back support are growing more and more dotty, writes Polly Toynbee.

2. Faithless Britain is still a country of compassion and principles (Daily Telegraph)

Times have changed, and Ed Miliband may be on to something with his political creed, says Fraser Nelson.

3. Republicans are losing the US culture wars (Financial Times)

The party seems ever more out of touch with a public mood framed by greater tolerance, writes Philip Stephens.

4. Don’t risk victory under false pretences, Ed (Times) (£)

After the virtuoso performance must come honesty about cuts, says Philip Collins. There is one approach that wins hands down.

5. Sanctions hurt Syria and Iran but regimes can ride on regardless (Independent)

One of the small but immensely wealthy states which may suffer from Iran's crisis is Dubai, writes Robert Fisk.

6. US debates: the illusion of choice (Guardian)

The issue is not what separates Romney and Obama, but how much they agree on, says Glenn Greenwald.

7. Syria inaction could ignite a fragile region (Financial Times)

Hostility with Turkey reflects the international system’s failure, writes Sinan Ulgen.

8. The BBC, tax and a question of morality (Daily Mail)

The corporation hands out 25,000 contracts a year to employees who do not pay tax at source, notes a Daily Mail leader.

9. Does the Tory party still care about its voters? (Daily Telegraph)

A metropolitan agenda aimed at winning new support has alienated the Conservative Party's traditional base, says Liam Fox.

10. Learn from the errors of the Westland Affair and let the Europeans come to our defence (Independent)

Yet again, when Britain is forced to choose between a special relationship with America and cultural affinity with Europe, it chooses dithering and delay instead, writes Mary Dejevsky.