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Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

New Statesman

1. Miliband's display of style and substance will worry the Tories (Independent)

Stunningly artful in positioning and projection, this speech by the Labour leader will resonate with many of the Liberal Democrats in government, says Steve Richards.

2. Not yet a Disraeli, but Miliband has taken a step closer to No 10 (Daily Telegraph)

The Labour Party conference has shown that leader Ed Miliband can talk human, writes Mary Riddell. Now can he win the bitter policy fights that lie ahead?

3. Ed Miliband's breathtaking bravura and a One Nation stroke of genius (Guardian)

This was the day Miliband took full command of his party and turned his private qualities at last into public strengths, writes Polly Toynbee.

4. Buy one political promise . . . get one free! (Times) (£)

We trust our supermarkets, writes Daniel Finkelstein. But a special offer like "Labour will make Britain one nation" turns us all into cynics.

5. Fluent, adroit... yet profoundly dishonest (Daily Mail)

Miliband's speech was markedly short on substance, but was adroitly crafted to strike chords with millions of disaffected voters, says a Daily Mail editorial.

6. Higher pay boosts economics and politics (Financial Times)

Policy to give the low-paid more money, rather than benefits, is worthy of debate, says John Kay.

7. Yes, Miliband demonstrated a new charisma. But he still needs to break from Tory austerity (Independent)

Miliband's promise to end free market experimentation in the NHS should be played on loop, writes Owen Jones.

8. British soldiers are dying in Afghanistan to win the war of Whitehall (Guardian)

Only one battle matters to the Ministry of Defence – the battle for resources, says Simon Jenkins. In this, the Taliban is not an enemy, but an ally.

9. Is unlimited growth a thing of the past? (Financial Times)

Today’s information age is full of sound and fury signifying little, writes Martin Wolf.

10. Is the coalition really giving us a freer society? (Daily Telegraph)

Smoking bans, CCTV, databanks... the crusade for liberty still has a long way to go, says Philip Johnston.