Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. We know a lot about Labour policy already (Independent)

The ideas Balls and Miliband have brought to this conference are distinctive, potentially vote-winning and far more important than their own personalities, says Steve Richards.

2. Romney must prove he is no John Kerry (Financial Times)

The Republican should lay out bold policies in this week’s debate, writes Stanley Greenberg.

3. Miliband and Balls do have a plan, but they needn't reveal all yet (Guardian)

There is no way to duck all cuts, nor is it wise to decide too much ahead of the election, writes Polly Toynbee. The two Eds will not be bullied into it.

4. Miliband needs to give Labour a shock (Financial Times)

Nothing threatens the party more than the perception that it cannot take tough decisions, writes Janan Ganesh.

5. First Labour must shake off its defeat-deniers (Times) (£)

Ed Miliband’s party will not prosper until it stops blaming the voters and accepts why it was rejected in 2010, argues Rachel Sylvester.

6. A rightwing insurrection is usurping our democracy (Guardian)

For 30 years big business, neoliberal thinktanks and the media have colluded to capture our political system, says George Monbiot. They're winning.

7. We are constantly told how clever Ed Balls is, so why can't he give us clear answers? (Daily Mail)

If the shadow chancellor understands the need to cut spending further, because Britain is still spending far too much, he should clearly say so, writes Simon Heffer.

8. Blame the great men for Europe’s crisis (Financial Times)

Answering ‘who is at fault?’ will be important in fixing the mess, says Gideon Rachman.

9. Would any jury have convicted Jimmy Savile? (Independent)

Is the cover-up - if there was one - really so incomprehensible, asks Mary Dejevsky.

10. Zen and the art of slowing everything down (Daily Telegraph)

Returning from a trip to Japan, it seems that in Britain we're always rushing to be where we are not, says Joan Bakewell.

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Tory Brexiter Daniel Hannan: Leave campaign never promised "radical decline" in immigration

The voters might not agree...

BBC Newsnight on Twitter

It was the Leave campaign's pledge to reduce EU immigration that won it the referendum. But Daniel Hannan struck a rather different tone on last night's Newsnight. "It means free movement of labour," the Conservative MEP said of the post-Brexit model he envisaged. An exasperated Evan Davis replied: “I’m sorry we’ve just been through three months of agony on the issue of immigration. The public have been led to believe that what they have voted for is an end to free movement." 

Hannan protested that EU migrants would lose "legal entitlements to live in other countries, to vote in other countries and to claim welfare and to have the same university tuition". But Davis wasn't backing down. "Why didn't you say this in the campaign? Why didn't you say in the campaign that you were wanting a scheme where we have free movement of labour? Come on, that's completely at odds with what the public think they have just voted for." 

Hannan concluded: "We never said there was going to be some radical decline ... we want a measure of control". Your Mole suspects many voters assumed otherwise. If immigration is barely changed, Hannan and others will soon be burned by the very fires they stoked. 

I'm a mole, innit.