Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Think again. In a few months it could be President Romney (Guardian)

Mitt Romney's lack of charm may not matter in this US election. America's economy needs this proven turnaround artist, argues Jonathan Freedland.

2. Take the bull by the horns. Leave the euro (Times) (£)

Spain is depressed, perhaps more spiritually than economically. But there is a way for Madrid to turn it around, says Matthew Parris.

3. London Metropolitan University is there to educate, not police (Guardian)


Since when did the survival of London Met, or any other university, depend on their ability to control the UK's borders, asks Nadine El-Enany.
Casting Mr Romney as Mister Moneybags is looking more like a mistake, writes Christopher Caldwell.
The Government's closure of so many Remploy factories is indefensible, argues Chris Bryant.
The world’s largest woman has been created in my backyard – and she shows how coal gave us room to enjoy leisure, says Matt Ridley.
New planning proposals have provoked an outcry from the public, Tory MPs and even some Cabinet ministers, argues Geoffrey Lean.
Those appointed at the bottom of the cycle tend to do well, writes John Gapper.
The gauche Nixon was elected. Twice. There’s no prohibitive reason Romney can’t do the same, says Rupert Cornwell.
Both British and US interests would be best served by a victory for Mitt Romney, writes Daniel Hannan.


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En français, s'il vous plaît! EU lead negotiator wants to talk Brexit in French

C'est très difficile. 

In November 2015, after the Paris attacks, Theresa May said: "Nous sommes solidaires avec vous, nous sommes tous ensemble." ("We are in solidarity with you, we are all together.")

But now the Prime Minister might have to brush up her French and take it to a much higher level.

Reuters reports the EU's lead Brexit negotiator, Michel Barnier, would like to hold the talks in French, not English (an EU spokeswoman said no official language had been agreed). 

As for the Home office? Aucun commentaire.

But on Twitter, British social media users are finding it all très amusant.

In the UK, foreign language teaching has suffered from years of neglect. The government may regret this now . . .

Julia Rampen is the editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog. She was previously deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines.