Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Bombing Iran is the way to make sure it gets the bomb (Financial Times)

There has never been a better time for the US to properly test Tehran’s intentions by suggesting everything-on-the-table bilateral negotiations, writes Philip Stephens.

2. Jeremy Hunt's in-tray will wipe that smile off his face (Guardian)

His job is to schmooze the public into accepting NHS changes, but the turmoil he inherits will make that nearly impossible, says Polly Toynbee.

3. Eds won't split – they know there's too much at stake (Independent)

There will be no repeat of the Blair/Brown rivalry that still traumatises Labour, says Steve Richards.

4. Shale - the hidden treasure that could transform our economy (Daily Telegraph)

Cameron’s U-turn on the environment has the greens howling, but should delight voters, says Fraser Nelson.

5. Draghi’s plan is a bold one, but who will bite? (Times) (£)

Spain may look at the European Central Bank’s plans, look at Greece and say "no thank you", writes Stephen King.

6. Don't blame the countryside for our lack of housing (Guardian)

Britain is desperately inefficient in its land use, and there are still no measures to bring empty property back on the market, writes Simon Jenkins.

7. An extensions free-for-all? It’ll be war (Daily Telegraph)

The coalition’s looser planning rules will spark chaos in the nation’s back yards and won't get building going, writes Clive Aslet.

8. Castro v Rubio – fight for the Latino vote (Financial Times)

Hispanics could determine the election and will only become more vital, says Jacob Weisberg.

9. Flirting Labour party is bankrupt of ideas (Daily Mail)

There was no acknowledgement of the need to shrink the bloated state, says a Daily Mail editorial.

10. More can still be done to get Britain growing (Daily Telegraph)

The government's response is a pragmatic one, but it's only the beginning, says a Telegraph leader.

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The big problem for the NHS? Local government cuts

Even a U-Turn on planned cuts to the service itself will still leave the NHS under heavy pressure. 

38Degrees has uncovered a series of grisly plans for the NHS over the coming years. Among the highlights: severe cuts to frontline services at the Midland Metropolitan Hospital, including but limited to the closure of its Accident and Emergency department. Elsewhere, one of three hospitals in Leicester, Leicestershire and Rutland are to be shuttered, while there will be cuts to acute services in Suffolk and North East Essex.

These cuts come despite an additional £8bn annual cash injection into the NHS, characterised as the bare minimum needed by Simon Stevens, the head of NHS England.

The cuts are outlined in draft sustainability and transformation plans (STP) that will be approved in October before kicking off a period of wider consultation.

The problem for the NHS is twofold: although its funding remains ringfenced, healthcare inflation means that in reality, the health service requires above-inflation increases to stand still. But the second, bigger problem aren’t cuts to the NHS but to the rest of government spending, particularly local government cuts.

That has seen more pressure on hospital beds as outpatients who require further non-emergency care have nowhere to go, increasing lifestyle problems as cash-strapped councils either close or increase prices at subsidised local authority gyms, build on green space to make the best out of Britain’s booming property market, and cut other corners to manage the growing backlog of devolved cuts.

All of which means even a bigger supply of cash for the NHS than the £8bn promised at the last election – even the bonanza pledged by Vote Leave in the referendum, in fact – will still find itself disappearing down the cracks left by cuts elsewhere. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. He usually writes about politics.