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Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

New Statesman

1. Atos is doing a good job – as the government's flakcatcher (Guardian)

Don't be surprised by the controversial company's Paralympic sponsorship, writes Zoe Williams. Outsourcing unpopular decisions is now policy.

2. Another runway at Heathrow is no solution (Independent)

It is time to be ambitious, to build an all-new airport in the Thames Estuary, argues an Independent leader.

3. Lift the threat to our precious green belt (Daily Mail)

The Prime Minister should pledge that the countryside on the outskirts of our cities will remain as unspoilt as ever, says a Daily Mail editorial.

4. Blair's era is finally over. Now Labour can shift from the centre ground (Guardian)

After the reshuffle, Ed Miliband should realise that voters are focused on jobs, benefits and rents, not on pensions, shares and house prices, says Peter Wilby.

5. Boo the Tories all you like, but they’re right about the economy (Daily Telegraph)

Unlike the deluded left, Conservatives understand there is no pain-free solution to our woes, argues Jeremy Warner.

6. Is Pakistan's hard line on blasphemy softening? (Guardian)

The Rimsha Masih case points to a dawning realisation that things have gone too far, says William Dalrymple. But it is only a beginning.

7. Only bombing Assad's forces will stop the slaughter now (Independent)

It need not become "another Iraq" and the Syrian military challenge can be met, says Amos Yadlin.

8. Act on the real causes of UK woes, Mr Osborne (Financial Times)

The chancellor will find it difficult to dismiss the opinions of the fiscal watchdog that he created, writes Chris Giles.

9. Shakespeare got it: great art is popular art (Times) (£)

A million housewives – or groundlings – can’t be wrong, writes David Aaronovitch. The best art is inspired by what people will pay for.

10. Street wit turns an eyesore into art (Daily Telegraph)

Unexpected moments of warmth, wit or simple strangeness in the city are to be treasured, says Robert Colvile.