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Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

New Statesman

1. The new cabinet: shuffling to the right (Guardian)

The reshuffle will stir searching questions for the dwindling band of progressives who have until now given this government the benefit of the doubt, says a Guardian editorial.

2. Mr Cameron throws down the gauntlet (Daily Mail)

The biggest question of all is how the new Tory team will fare against entrenched Lib Dem resistance, says a Daily Mail editorial.

3. Obstacles removed. Now get on and govern (Times) (£)

By moving a few big beasts and tweaking the lower ranks, Cameron has created a team more in his own image, writes Daniel Finkelstein.

4. What a reshuffle. It's the return of Brown and Blair (Guardian)

David Cameron can wail, but he is the real ditherer – ever more Tony Blair to George Osborne's Gordon Brown, says Simon Jenkins.

5. Belfast riots are price of poor politics (Independent)

Riots on the streets of Belfast look alarmingly like a return to the bad old days, says an Independent editorial.

6. Memo to ministers – ignore the briefing (Financial Times)

The newcomers need to take a calculated risk and settle on a main priority, writes James Purnell.

7. Hard graft can make Britain great again (Daily Telegraph)

We need to take a long, hard look at the policies that discourage the strivers in our society, says Dominic Raab.

8. Chancellors are supposed to be hated – it's part of their job (Independent)

The general squeeze will not relent, writes Hamish McRae. Finance ministers will be unpopular.

9. Merkel’s good politics and bad economics (Financial Times)

Draghi’s medicine may deliver short-term relief but no long-term cure, writes Josef Joffe.

10. Longer speeches only signal a hard slog ahead (Daily Telegraph)

The first day back at Holyrood suggests there's not much to look forward to this term, writes Alan Cochrane.