Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. It's not the names that matter but the policies (Independent)

Only two reshuffles in 30 years have made a big difference to the fate of a government, writes Steve Richards.

2. Now Obama must build the case for government (Financial Times)

The president will have to avoid treading on the American dream, writes Gideon Rachman.

3. The cracks between the two Eds could swallow Labour’s hopes (Daily Telegraph)

Like Midas, the Labour leader appears to have it all – but he must show where the power lies, says Mary Riddell.

4. Free schools are a disaster (Guardian)

Michael Gove's flagship policy is a huge waste of money, socially divisive and won't raise educational standards, argues Francis Gilbert.

5. We deserve better than this yoni-centric claptrap (Independent)

Claims that the vagina is 'part of the female soul' are, frankly, insulting, says Laurie Penny.

6. These angry Tories can't see what 'no alternative' means (Guardian)

So blinded by dogma are they that the reality of the cuts to come has not yet hit home with Cameron's critics, writes Polly Toynbee. But it soon will.

7. The US economy may surprise us all (Financial Times)

Five factors suggest a coming surge in growth, writes Roger Altman.

8. Game changer? No, more an echo chamber (Times) (£)

David Cameron’s reshuffle today will be secateurs in the Rose Garden rather than a Night of the Long Knives, says Rachel Sylvester.

9. We must shift science out of the geek ghetto (Daily Telegraph)

Britain’s future rests on taking numbers seriously, says Liz Truss.

10. The Gentle Tory is alive and well – on television (Guardian)

Period dramas like Parade's End reveal a yearning for a conservative type that politics has left behind, says David Priestland.

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Watch: David Cameron calls on Jeremy Corbyn to stand down as Labour leader

The soon-to-be-ex Prime Minister shouts "for heaven's sake man, go!" in a heated exchange at Prime Minister's Questions.

Losing track of what the various players in the ongoing constitutional crisis believe? Sick of politicians flip-flopping? Starting, frankly, to get tired of the whole thing?

At today's PMQs, David Cameron looked equally rattled - but he managed to make one thing clear. After Jeremy Corbyn made a reference to Cameron's imminent departure from the top post, the Prime Minister replied by saying the Labour leader should also stand down.

"It might be in my party’s interest for him to sit there," Cameron said. "It's not in the national interest. I would say: for heaven’s sake, man, go!"

Watch the clip below:

I'm a mole, innit.