Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Labour must face this fact – it may be better in coalition (Guardian)

Spitting expletives at the Lib Dems has to stop, writes Polly Toynbee. If they'd governed together we'd have had no Iraq or civil liberties abuses.

2. When the Queen gave me a story, I didn't blab (Independent)

If you go around printing people's informal remarks, pretty soon you'll find your social circle confined to the newsroom, writes Andreas Whittam Smith.

3. US must not hide from the Middle East (Financial Times)

The American president would benefit by setting out a decisive regional strategy, says Philip Stephens.

4. Labour needs real cuts as well as real ideas (Times) (£)

What happens to the benefits bill under a Miliband government, asks Philip Collins. Voters need details as well as philosophy.

5. The Hugo Chávez cult is over (Guardian)

Oil can no longer blind Venezuelans to their leader's failure, says Francisco Toro. The flaws in Chávez's 21st-century socialism are all too clear.

6. Won’t Osborne learn the lesson? Wealth taxes don’t work (Daily Telegraph)

When even Tories talk about squeezing the rich, it’s clear Britain is heading for trouble, argues Fraser Nelson.

7. South Africa drifts under Jacob Zuma (Financial Times)

A country that should be leading finds itself at a dangerous impasse, says an FT editorial.

8. To govern alone, Tories must reach out to all voters, not pander to their own (Guardian)

David Cameron needs to show a determination to make life better for people whether they voted Conservative or not, says Michael Ashcroft.

9. Chicago’s got the second city blues (Daily Mail)

Chicago isn’t inhabited by savages, writes Martin Samuel. For some reason, though, its government is happy to let you think that way.

10. America’s best weapons are law and justice (Daily Telegraph)

Open and fair trials are playing an important role in fighting the al-Qaeda terror threat, writes Mark Martins.

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What did Jeremy Corbyn really say about Bin Laden?

He's been critiqued for calling Bin Laden's death a "tragedy". But what did Jeremy Corbyn really say?

Jeremy Corbyn is under fire for describing Bin Laden’s death as a “tragedy” in the Sun, but what did the Labour leadership frontrunner really say?

In remarks made to Press TV, the state-backed Iranian broadcaster, the Islington North MP said:

“This was an assassination attempt, and is yet another tragedy, upon a tragedy, upon a tragedy. The World Trade Center was a tragedy, the attack on Afghanistan was a tragedy, the war in Iraq was a tragedy. Tens of thousands of people have died.”

He also added that it was his preference that Osama Bin Laden be put on trial, a view shared by, among other people, Barack Obama and Boris Johnson.

Although Andy Burnham, one of Corbyn’s rivals for the leadership, will later today claim that “there is everything to play for” in the contest, with “tens of thousands still to vote”, the row is unlikely to harm Corbyn’s chances of becoming Labour leader. 

Stephen Bush is editor of the Staggers, the New Statesman’s political blog.