Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Ed Miliband, show us you have what it takes to be prime minister (Guardian)

His Labour party is resurgent, writes Alan Johnson. But in Manchester, Miliband must do more to demonstrate that he is a leader.

2. Power has come at a colossal price that Clegg isn't ready to concede (Independent)

It takes some chutzpah to claim that the Lib Dems have made a great leap forward when some polls place them behind Ukip, writes Steve Richards.

3. Politicians cannot hide from UK finances (Financial Times)

Our fiscal problems will not abate when the structural deficit recedes, write Nick Pearce and Gavin Kelly.

4. Another chapter in the slow death of politics (Daily Telegraph)

The public has lost faith in left and right – and it’s hard to see how it can be recovered, writes Sue Cameron.

5. UKIP’s disturbed vision is a Tory nightmare (Times) (£)

Nigel Farage’s party offers only dangerously appealing right-wing comfort politics that don’t stand up to scrutiny, writes David Aaronovitch.

6. Nick agrees with Nick (Guardian)

Clegg's calculation that there is ample space for his brand of centrism is questionable, to say the least, argues a Guardian editorial.

7. Not even the great economists of history can get us out of this fix (Daily Telegraph)

Our financial crisis is unique, and the route back to health will be painful, costly and long, says Jeremy Warner.

8. Rule of law can rid the world of poverty (Financial Times)

The poor will be safe when their rights are protected, write George Soros and Fazle Hasan Abed.

9. The Lib Dem leader's plan to plunder the hard-earned assets of Britain's pensioners (Daily Mail)

Clegg’s proposals are ill-considered, unworkable and unfair, says Stephen Glover.

10. May Andrew Mitchell survive the baying mob (Guardian)

The chief whip behaved boorishly, but should not be vilified, argues Geoffrey Wheatcroft. This story is really about the deterioration of the police.

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Will Jeremy Corbyn stand down if Labour loses the general election?

Defeat at the polls might not be the end of Corbyn’s leadership.

The latest polls suggest that Labour is headed for heavy defeat in the June general election. Usually a general election loss would be the trigger for a leader to quit: Michael Foot, Gordon Brown and Ed Miliband all stood down after their first defeat, although Neil Kinnock saw out two losses before resigning in 1992.

It’s possible, if unlikely, that Corbyn could become prime minister. If that prospect doesn’t materialise, however, the question is: will Corbyn follow the majority of his predecessors and resign, or will he hang on in office?

Will Corbyn stand down? The rules

There is no formal process for the parliamentary Labour party to oust its leader, as it discovered in the 2016 leadership challenge. Even after a majority of his MPs had voted no confidence in him, Corbyn stayed on, ultimately winning his second leadership contest after it was decided that the current leader should be automatically included on the ballot.

This year’s conference will vote on to reform the leadership selection process that would make it easier for a left-wing candidate to get on the ballot (nicknamed the “McDonnell amendment” by centrists): Corbyn could be waiting for this motion to pass before he resigns.

Will Corbyn stand down? The membership

Corbyn’s support in the membership is still strong. Without an equally compelling candidate to put before the party, Corbyn’s opponents in the PLP are unlikely to initiate another leadership battle they’re likely to lose.

That said, a general election loss could change that. Polling from March suggests that half of Labour members wanted Corbyn to stand down either immediately or before the general election.

Will Corbyn stand down? The rumours

Sources close to Corbyn have said that he might not stand down, even if he leads Labour to a crushing defeat this June. They mention Kinnock’s survival after the 1987 general election as a precedent (although at the 1987 election, Labour did gain seats).

Will Corbyn stand down? The verdict

Given his struggles to manage his own MPs and the example of other leaders, it would be remarkable if Corbyn did not stand down should Labour lose the general election. However, staying on after a vote of no-confidence in 2016 was also remarkable, and the mooted changes to the leadership election process give him a reason to hold on until September in order to secure a left-wing succession.

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