Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Ed Miliband, show us you have what it takes to be prime minister (Guardian)

His Labour party is resurgent, writes Alan Johnson. But in Manchester, Miliband must do more to demonstrate that he is a leader.

2. Power has come at a colossal price that Clegg isn't ready to concede (Independent)

It takes some chutzpah to claim that the Lib Dems have made a great leap forward when some polls place them behind Ukip, writes Steve Richards.

3. Politicians cannot hide from UK finances (Financial Times)

Our fiscal problems will not abate when the structural deficit recedes, write Nick Pearce and Gavin Kelly.

4. Another chapter in the slow death of politics (Daily Telegraph)

The public has lost faith in left and right – and it’s hard to see how it can be recovered, writes Sue Cameron.

5. UKIP’s disturbed vision is a Tory nightmare (Times) (£)

Nigel Farage’s party offers only dangerously appealing right-wing comfort politics that don’t stand up to scrutiny, writes David Aaronovitch.

6. Nick agrees with Nick (Guardian)

Clegg's calculation that there is ample space for his brand of centrism is questionable, to say the least, argues a Guardian editorial.

7. Not even the great economists of history can get us out of this fix (Daily Telegraph)

Our financial crisis is unique, and the route back to health will be painful, costly and long, says Jeremy Warner.

8. Rule of law can rid the world of poverty (Financial Times)

The poor will be safe when their rights are protected, write George Soros and Fazle Hasan Abed.

9. The Lib Dem leader's plan to plunder the hard-earned assets of Britain's pensioners (Daily Mail)

Clegg’s proposals are ill-considered, unworkable and unfair, says Stephen Glover.

10. May Andrew Mitchell survive the baying mob (Guardian)

The chief whip behaved boorishly, but should not be vilified, argues Geoffrey Wheatcroft. This story is really about the deterioration of the police.

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New Digital Editor: Serena Kutchinsky

The New Statesman appoints Serena Kutchinsky as Digital Editor.

Serena Kutchinsky is to join the New Statesman as digital editor in September. She will lead the expansion of the New Statesman across a variety of digital platforms.

Serena has over a decade of experience working in digital media and is currently the digital editor of Newsweek Europe. Since she joined the title, traffic to the website has increased by almost 250 per cent. Previously, Serena was the digital editor of Prospect magazine and also the assistant digital editor of the Sunday Times - part of the team which launched the Sunday Times website and tablet editions.

Jason Cowley, New Statesman editor, said: “Serena joins us at a great time for the New Statesman, and, building on the excellent work of recent years, she has just the skills and experience we need to help lead the next stage of our expansion as a print-digital hybrid.”

Serena Kutchinsky said: “I am delighted to be joining the New Statesman team and to have the opportunity to drive forward its digital strategy. The website is already established as the home of free-thinking journalism online in the UK and I look forward to leading our expansion and growing the global readership of this historic title.

In June, the New Statesman website recorded record traffic figures when more than four million unique users read more than 27 million pages. The circulation of the weekly magazine is growing steadily and now stands at 33,400, the highest it has been since the early 1980s.