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Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Never mind all those badgers – we’ve got to save the Cleggster (Daily Telegraph)

The Deputy PM may be copping the flak, but think where the Tories would be without him, says Boris Johnson.

2. Sweary biker's decision (Sun)

Andrew Mitchell has a choice, says Trevor Kavanagh. He must sue the police for defamation – or resign.

3. Mitt Romney is too rational for a deluded Republican base (Guardian)

The real surprise is that someone as plausible as him has lasted this long in a party so extreme and eccentric, says Gary Younge.

4. Come on you local councillors. Resist these cuts! (Independent)

Councils across Britain will soon by unable to deliver statutory services, writes Owen Jones. Managing the misery isn't good enough. Local councillors must take action.

5. The US economy is still in a sorry state (Financial Times)

It requires optimism at this stage to believe the patient is about to arise and go for a jog, writes Edward Luce.

6. Justice and security bill: this is a dangerous, spurious law (Guardian)

Liberal Democrats at their conference must vote to reject the shameful, self-serving, spook-authored bill, argues Shami Chakrabarti.

7. How Mitt Romney's throwing away the keys to the White House (Daily Mail)

The British interest will be better served by the incumbent, not the novice, says former US ambassador Christopher Meyer.

8. Only Tolstoy’s two warriors can cut the UK’s debt (Financial Times)

It takes time and patience to reduce indebtedness, writes Norman Lamont.

9. Michael Gove has not been radical enough (Times) (£)

The English Baccalaureate proposals still leave young people specialising too early, says Peter Lampl.

10. Where’s the ‘freedom’ in the freedom to abuse? (Independent)

In good societies there have to be curbs on what can be said, argues Yasmin Alibhai-Brown. Sometimes freedom has to give way.