Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Coming through... the arrogance of power (Telegraph)
Andrew Mitchell can apologise all he wants, but he's done his bit to retoxify the Tory brand, says Matthew Norman 

2. It's the whale in the paddling pool of politics (Times £)
Party funding is a plague on us all, says Matthew Parris

3. Tory posh boys who think they're born to rule (Daily Mail)
You see the true character of a politician when they think they're off camera, says Amanda Platell

4. The real Mitt Romney is instensely relaxed among the filthy rich (Guardian)
Wanting politicians to drop the artifice and tell it to us straight is all very well, but we may not like what we hear, says Jonathan Freedland

5. The last thing the Church of England needs is a pleasant middle manager (Telegraph)
The next Archbishop of Canterbury must connect with all of Britain's people, says Charles Moore

6. Paul Burstow is not just a miffed ex-minister (Daily Mail)
He's right that social care needs reform, says Dominique Jackson

7. Morally repugnant tax avoiders can rest easy under Cameron (Guardian)
Moving from tax haven to tax haven is called success, says Tany Gold 

8. I'm not sorry for saying sorry (Independent)
The Lib Dem leader faces a difficult conference, says Andrew Grice 

9. Is the modern military really scared of a baby? (Times £)
The army should get its head out of the desert sand, says Janice Turner

10. When a sacred text is the word of man (Independent)
Christians are able to accept the reinterpretations of Jesus, says Selina O'Grady

Morning Call
Ukip's Nigel Farage and Paul Nuttall. Photo: Getty
Show Hide image

Is the general election 2017 the end of Ukip?

Ukip led the way to Brexit, but now the party is on less than 10 per cent in the polls. 

Ukip could be finished. Ukip has only ever had two MPs, but it held an outside influence on politics: without it, we’d probably never have had the EU referendum. But Brexit has turned Ukip into a single-issue party without an issue. Ukip’s sole remaining MP, Douglas Carswell, left the party in March 2017, and told Sky News’ Adam Boulton that there was “no point” to the party anymore. 

Not everyone in Ukip has given up, though: Nigel Farage told Peston on Sunday that Ukip “will survive”, and current leader Paul Nuttall will be contesting a seat this year. But Ukip is standing in fewer constituencies than last time thanks to a shortage of both money and people. Who benefits if Ukip is finished? It’s likely to be the Tories. 

Is Ukip finished? 

What are Ukip's poll ratings?

Ukip’s poll ratings peaked in June 2016 at 16 per cent. Since the leave campaign’s success, that has steadily declined so that Ukip is going into the 2017 general election on 4 per cent, according to the latest polls. If the polls can be trusted, that’s a serious collapse.

Can Ukip get anymore MPs?

In the 2015 general election Ukip contested nearly every seat and got 13 per cent of the vote, making it the third biggest party (although is only returned one MP). Now Ukip is reportedly struggling to find candidates and could stand in as few as 100 seats. Ukip leader Paul Nuttall will stand in Boston and Skegness, but both ex-leader Nigel Farage and donor Arron Banks have ruled themselves out of running this time.

How many members does Ukip have?

Ukip’s membership declined from 45,994 at the 2015 general election to 39,000 in 2016. That’s a worrying sign for any political party, which relies on grassroots memberships to put in the campaigning legwork.

What does Ukip's decline mean for Labour and the Conservatives? 

The rise of Ukip took votes from both the Conservatives and Labour, with a nationalist message that appealed to disaffected voters from both right and left. But the decline of Ukip only seems to be helping the Conservatives. Stephen Bush has written about how in Wales voting Ukip seems to have been a gateway drug for traditional Labour voters who are now backing the mainstream right; so the voters Ukip took from the Conservatives are reverting to the Conservatives, and the ones they took from Labour are transferring to the Conservatives too.

Ukip might be finished as an electoral force, but its influence on the rest of British politics will be felt for many years yet. 

0800 7318496