Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Like Tammy Wynette, Lib Dems must stand by their man (Guardian)

Coalition has been tough for the party and for Nick Clegg, yet his brave choices deserve our continued support, says Menzies Campbell.

2. British foreign policy should be realist (Financial Times)

Emotion draws the country across the Atlantic but hard calculation pulls it back to Europe, writes Philip Stephens.

3. Nick Clegg still has time to make a gracious exit as Liberal Democrat leader - with head held high (Independent)

The Lib Dem leader has made too many unforced errors for his own good, writes Mary Ann Sieghart.

4. Forget Mr Has-Been. The prize is power (Times) (£)

The future for the Lib Dems can only be as the third party of government, not as a left-wing alternative to Labour, says Philip Collins.

5. James Murdoch: a fit and proper pasting (Guardian)

Ofcom did not mince its words in damning a hereditary magnate who "repeatedly fell short of the conduct expected of him", says a Guardian editorial.

6. Our politics is bursting with life – it’s the parties that are dying (Daily Telegraph)

There is no shortage of support for the right causes, but our leaders do not address them, writes Fraser Nelson.

7. Puzzle of falling UK labour productivity (Financial Times)

Labour hoarding, substitution of labour for capital and failings in finance are only part of the answer, says Martin Wolf.

8. Hospital death rates we can't ignore (Independent)

This is a level of risk that would be alarming in the developing world, never mind 21st-century Britain, says an Independent leader.

9. Planning free-for-all is a blueprint for discord (Daily Mail)

To deny homeowners the right to object to dramatic changes is the exact opposite of the localism the Tories claim to preach, says a Daily Mail editorial.

10. History as fantasy is no substitute for rigorous truth (Guardian)

Whether it's Richard III's corpse, Jesus's wife or King Arthur's castle, to be seduced by myth is to flirt with fanaticism, writes Simon Jenkins.

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A global marketplace: the internet represents exporting’s biggest opportunity

The advent of the internet age has made the whole world a single marketplace. Selling goods online through digital means offers British businesses huge opportunities for international growth. The UK was one of the earliest adopters of online retail platforms, and UK online sales revenues are growing at around 20 per cent each year, not just driving wider economic growth, but promoting the British brand to an enthusiastic audience.

Global e-commerce turnover grew at a similar rate in 2014-15 to over $2.2trln. The Asia-Pacific region, for example, is embracing e-marketplaces with 28 per cent growth in 2015 to over $1trln of sales. This demonstrates the massive opportunities for UK exporters to sell their goods more easily to the world’s largest consumer markets. My department, the Department for International Trade, is committed to being a leader in promoting these opportunities. We are supporting UK businesses in identifying these markets, and are providing access to services and support to exploit this dramatic growth in digital commerce.

With the UK leading innovation, it is one of the responsibilities of government to demonstrate just what can be done. My department is investing more in digital services to reach and support many more businesses, and last November we launched our new digital trade hub: www.great.gov.uk. Working with partners such as Lloyds Banking Group, the new site will make it easier for UK businesses to access overseas business opportunities and to take those first steps to exporting.

The ‘Selling Online Overseas Tool’ within the hub was launched in collaboration with 37 e-marketplaces including Amazon and Rakuten, who collectively represent over 2bn online consumers across the globe. The first government service of its kind, the tool allows UK exporters to apply to some of the world’s leading overseas e-marketplaces in order to sell their products to customers they otherwise would not have reached. Companies can also access thousands of pounds’ worth of discounts, including waived commission and special marketing packages, created exclusively for Department for International Trade clients and the e-exporting programme team plans to deliver additional online promotions with some of the world’s leading e-marketplaces across priority markets.

We are also working with over 50 private sector partners to promote our Exporting is GREAT campaign, and to support the development and launch of our digital trade platform. The government’s Exporting is GREAT campaign is targeting potential partners across the world as our export trade hub launches in key international markets to open direct export opportunities for UK businesses. Overseas buyers will now be able to access our new ‘Find a Supplier’ service on the website which will match them with exporters across the UK who have created profiles and will be able to meet their needs.

With Lloyds in particular we are pleased that our partnership last year helped over 6,000 UK businesses to start trading overseas, and are proud of our association with the International Trade Portal. Digital marketplaces have revolutionised retail in the UK, and are now connecting consumers across the world. UK businesses need to seize this opportunity to offer their products to potentially billions of buyers and we, along with partners like Lloyds, will do all we can to help them do just that.

Taken from the New Statesman roundtable supplement Going Digital, Going Global: How digital skills can help any business trade internationally

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