Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. UK has political capital to lift investment (Financial Times)

There is significant room for the government to raise capital spending, says Tory MP Jesse Norman.

2. No exaggeration: Ukip is now a force to reckon with (Guardian)

If the cards fall its way, Nigel Farage's party will shape both the 2015 election and the politics of Britain and Europe for a generation, says Martin Kettle.

3. Why fuss over exams at 16? No one else does (Times) (£)

O levels, GCSEs or the EBC – they all look obsolete as the school-leaving age rises to 18, writes David Miliband.

4. What exactly makes the Lib Dems different? (Independent)

The party has two problems: lack of policy impact and ambivalence over the true meaning of localism, says Steve Richards.

5. This shameful BAE Systems deal would rip the heart out of Britain plc (Daily Mail)

Companies with the word ‘British’ in their name have become easy prey for predators, writes Alex Brummer.

6. Do we really want to arm our police? (Daily Telegraph)

Despite the murder of two unarmed WPcs in Manchester, few officers want an armed force, writes Philip Johnston.

7. The justice and security bill is on the right track (Guardian)

As an instinctive liberal, I believe this bill will shine a light into the state's darkest corners, writes Ken Clarke.

8. Pinstripes, plain views – and a real problem for Cameron (Daily Telegraph)

Ukip hopes to split the Tory leadership from its base, writes Paul Goodman. The PM would be a fool to ignore the threat.

9. A plague we must stop before it is endemic (Independent)

If Britain was ever an uncorrupt society, those days are long passed, writes Andreas Whittam Smith. MPs and police officers work in small, closed societies where bad practices easily flourish.

10. The real lesson from Japan’s lost decade (Financial Times)

The Treasury should set the Bank of England a nominal GDP target, argues Chris Giles.

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New Digital Editor: Serena Kutchinsky

The New Statesman appoints Serena Kutchinsky as Digital Editor.

Serena Kutchinsky is to join the New Statesman as digital editor in September. She will lead the expansion of the New Statesman across a variety of digital platforms.

Serena has over a decade of experience working in digital media and is currently the digital editor of Newsweek Europe. Since she joined the title, traffic to the website has increased by almost 250 per cent. Previously, Serena was the digital editor of Prospect magazine and also the assistant digital editor of the Sunday Times - part of the team which launched the Sunday Times website and tablet editions.

Jason Cowley, New Statesman editor, said: “Serena joins us at a great time for the New Statesman, and, building on the excellent work of recent years, she has just the skills and experience we need to help lead the next stage of our expansion as a print-digital hybrid.”

Serena Kutchinsky said: “I am delighted to be joining the New Statesman team and to have the opportunity to drive forward its digital strategy. The website is already established as the home of free-thinking journalism online in the UK and I look forward to leading our expansion and growing the global readership of this historic title.

In June, the New Statesman website recorded record traffic figures when more than four million unique users read more than 27 million pages. The circulation of the weekly magazine is growing steadily and now stands at 33,400, the highest it has been since the early 1980s.