Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. What would the Age of Ed mean for Britain? Even he doesn’t know (Daily Telegraph)

Events are propelling Miliband towards No 10, but neither he nor his party are ready, argues Fraser Nelson.

2. The John Lewis motto should be 'never knowingly underpay' (Guardian)

Why celebrate the store's business model when its famed generosity doesn't extend to its outsourced and low-paid cleaners, writes Polly Toynbee.

3. The Lib Dems need to be more liberal (Financial Times)

Left libertarianism seems the right way to go for the junior coalition party, says Samuel Brittan.

4. Ignore the slogans. It’s all about leadership (Times) (£)

Three parties, three themes, but only one real question – can the man in charge make his followers back him, writes Philip Collins.

5. Hillsborough shows it's time for elected police commissioners (Guardian)

If the public head of Sheffield police had been accountable to voters we may have avoided the 23 years of cover-ups, argues Simon Jenkins.

6. Looking the American giants in the eye (Daily Telegraph)

A merger between BAE and its European rival EADS could create a defence superpower, writes Michael Clarke.

7. There's a moral case for striking instead of doing nothing (Independent)

For the first time in a generation the radical left has both reason and momentum on its side - we all must act to reject this failing austerity project, says Laurie Penny.

8. Ben Bernanke: flakcatcher-in-chief (Guardian)

Barack Obama's administration are likely to greet the Federal Reserve chief's latest move with a sigh of relief, says a Guardian editorial.

9. The US is becoming a selective superpower (Financial Times)

The country’s global reach will be reduced in a gradual reshaping of the postwar order, writes Philip Stephens.

10. Yes, he may have killed the princes in the Tower, but now we should give our last English king a decent burial (Daily Mail)

There is much that we know of the good he did in a turbulent age, he deserves, with due ceremony, a decent burial, says Simon Heffer.

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Can Philip Hammond save the Conservatives from public anger at their DUP deal?

The Chancellor has the wriggle room to get close to the DUP's spending increase – but emotion matters more than facts in politics.

The magic money tree exists, and it is growing in Northern Ireland. That’s the attack line that Labour will throw at Theresa May in the wake of her £1bn deal with the DUP to keep her party in office.

It’s worth noting that while £1bn is a big deal in terms of Northern Ireland’s budget – just a touch under £10bn in 2016/17 – as far as the total expenditure of the British government goes, it’s peanuts.

The British government spent £778bn last year – we’re talking about spending an amount of money in Northern Ireland over the course of two years that the NHS loses in pen theft over the course of one in England. To match the increase in relative terms, you’d be looking at a £35bn increase in spending.

But, of course, political arguments are about gut instinct rather than actual numbers. The perception that the streets of Antrim are being paved by gold while the public realm in England, Scotland and Wales falls into disrepair is a real danger to the Conservatives.

But the good news for them is that last year Philip Hammond tweaked his targets to give himself greater headroom in case of a Brexit shock. Now the Tories have experienced a shock of a different kind – a Corbyn shock. That shock was partly due to the Labour leader’s good campaign and May’s bad campaign, but it was also powered by anger at cuts to schools and anger among NHS workers at Jeremy Hunt’s stewardship of the NHS. Conservative MPs have already made it clear to May that the party must not go to the country again while defending cuts to school spending.

Hammond can get to slightly under that £35bn and still stick to his targets. That will mean that the DUP still get to rave about their higher-than-average increase, while avoiding another election in which cuts to schools are front-and-centre. But whether that deprives Labour of their “cuts for you, but not for them” attack line is another question entirely. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to domestic and global politics.

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