Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. What would the Age of Ed mean for Britain? Even he doesn’t know (Daily Telegraph)

Events are propelling Miliband towards No 10, but neither he nor his party are ready, argues Fraser Nelson.

2. The John Lewis motto should be 'never knowingly underpay' (Guardian)

Why celebrate the store's business model when its famed generosity doesn't extend to its outsourced and low-paid cleaners, writes Polly Toynbee.

3. The Lib Dems need to be more liberal (Financial Times)

Left libertarianism seems the right way to go for the junior coalition party, says Samuel Brittan.

4. Ignore the slogans. It’s all about leadership (Times) (£)

Three parties, three themes, but only one real question – can the man in charge make his followers back him, writes Philip Collins.

5. Hillsborough shows it's time for elected police commissioners (Guardian)

If the public head of Sheffield police had been accountable to voters we may have avoided the 23 years of cover-ups, argues Simon Jenkins.

6. Looking the American giants in the eye (Daily Telegraph)

A merger between BAE and its European rival EADS could create a defence superpower, writes Michael Clarke.

7. There's a moral case for striking instead of doing nothing (Independent)

For the first time in a generation the radical left has both reason and momentum on its side - we all must act to reject this failing austerity project, says Laurie Penny.

8. Ben Bernanke: flakcatcher-in-chief (Guardian)

Barack Obama's administration are likely to greet the Federal Reserve chief's latest move with a sigh of relief, says a Guardian editorial.

9. The US is becoming a selective superpower (Financial Times)

The country’s global reach will be reduced in a gradual reshaping of the postwar order, writes Philip Stephens.

10. Yes, he may have killed the princes in the Tower, but now we should give our last English king a decent burial (Daily Mail)

There is much that we know of the good he did in a turbulent age, he deserves, with due ceremony, a decent burial, says Simon Heffer.

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Theresa May is paying the price for mismanaging Boris Johnson

The Foreign Secretary's bruised ego may end up destroying Theresa May. 

And to think that Theresa May scheduled her big speech for this Friday to make sure that Conservative party conference wouldn’t be dominated by the matter of Brexit. Now, thanks to Boris Johnson, it won’t just be her conference, but Labour’s, which is overshadowed by Brexit in general and Tory in-fighting in particular. (One imagines that the Labour leadership will find a way to cope somehow.)

May is paying the price for mismanaging Johnson during her period of political hegemony after she became leader. After he was betrayed by Michael Gove and lacking any particular faction in the parliamentary party, she brought him back from the brink of political death by making him Foreign Secretary, but also used her strength and his weakness to shrink his empire.

The Foreign Office had its responsibility for negotiating Brexit hived off to the newly-created Department for Exiting the European Union (Dexeu) and for navigating post-Brexit trade deals to the Department of International Trade. Johnson was given control of one of the great offices of state, but with no responsibility at all for the greatest foreign policy challenge since the Second World War.

Adding to his discomfort, the new Foreign Secretary was regularly the subject of jokes from the Prime Minister and cabinet colleagues. May likened him to a dog that had to be put down. Philip Hammond quipped about him during his joke-fuelled 2017 Budget. All of which gave Johnson’s allies the impression that Johnson-hunting was a licensed sport as far as Downing Street was concerned. He was then shut out of the election campaign and has continued to be a marginalised figure even as the disappointing election result forced May to involve the wider cabinet in policymaking.

His sense of exclusion from the discussions around May’s Florence speech only added to his sense of isolation. May forgot that if you aren’t going to kill, don’t wound: now, thanks to her lost majority, she can’t afford to put any of the Brexiteers out in the cold, and Johnson is once again where he wants to be: centre-stage. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to domestic and global politics.