Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Mo Farah's joyful embrace of Britishness points the way to a more integrated future (Daily Mail)

The Games showed this country’s diverse identity in its very best light, made and re-made by natives and strangers through sheer determination, writes Yasmin Alibhai-Brown.

2. Give John Major the credit he's due (Guardian)

As we celebrate Team GB's Olympic success, spare a thought for the 'unknown prime minister' who made it possible, says Geoffrey Wheatcroft.

3. Not a Palin, but still a gamble: meet Paul Ryan (Times) (£)

Mitt Romney’s running-mate will make the election a contest between two visions, not just a referendum on Obama, writes Tim Montgomerie.

4. A principled but doomed running mate (Financial Times)

Ryan represents a big step in the direction of conservative honesty, writes Jacob Weisberg.

5. London and Team GB – take a bow. You’ve dazzled the world (Daily Telegraph)

This glorious festival hasn’t changed us, but it has shown just what we’re capable of, says Boris Johnson.

6. GB shows we can truly excel (Sun)

As a nation we can win gold as a global trading nation freed from the tentacles of European bureaucracy, says Trevor Kavanagh.

7. Cameron must now embrace the spirit of the Games (Independent)

The Olympics should inspire the PM to be bold – and to return to the themes of the Big Society, says Ian Birrell.

8. Our new approach to aid is a worthy legacy (Daily Telegraph)

We must harness the Olympic spirit to stop hunger blighting the lives of millions, argues Michael Howard.

9. Assad’s fall presents Turkey with another dilemma (Financial Times)

Erdogan’s efforts to address Kurdish grievances are no longer enough, writes David Gardner.

10. The Beastie Boy who really is a role model – to rock stars (Guardian)

Beastie Boy Adam Yauch's will refuses permission for his music to feature in ads, writes John Harris. Even the Clash couldn't manage that.

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Andy Burnham's full speech on attack: "Manchester is waking up to the most difficult of dawns"

"We are grieving today, but we are strong."

Following Monday night's terror attack on an Ariana Grande concert at the Manchester Arena, newly elected mayor of the city Andy Burnham, gave a speech outside Manchester Town Hall on Tuesday morning, the full text of which is below: 

After our darkest of nights, Manchester is today waking up to the most difficult of dawns. 

It’s hard to believe what has happened here in the last few hours and to put into words the shock, anger and hurt that we feel today.

These were children, young people and their families that those responsible chose to terrorise and kill.

This was an evil act. Our first thoughts are with the families of those killed and injured. And we will do whatever we can to support them.

We are grieving today, but we are strong. Today it will be business as usual as far as possible in our great city.

I want to thank the hundreds of police, fire and ambulance staff who worked throughout the night in the most difficult circumstances imaginable.

We have had messages of support from cities around the country and across the world, and we want to thank them for that.

But lastly I wanted to thank the people of Manchester. Even in the minute after the attack, they opened their doors to strangers and drove them away from danger.

They gave the best possible immediate response to those who seek to divide us and it will be that spirit of Manchester that will prevail and hold us together.

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