Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Mo Farah's joyful embrace of Britishness points the way to a more integrated future (Daily Mail)

The Games showed this country’s diverse identity in its very best light, made and re-made by natives and strangers through sheer determination, writes Yasmin Alibhai-Brown.

2. Give John Major the credit he's due (Guardian)

As we celebrate Team GB's Olympic success, spare a thought for the 'unknown prime minister' who made it possible, says Geoffrey Wheatcroft.

3. Not a Palin, but still a gamble: meet Paul Ryan (Times) (£)

Mitt Romney’s running-mate will make the election a contest between two visions, not just a referendum on Obama, writes Tim Montgomerie.

4. A principled but doomed running mate (Financial Times)

Ryan represents a big step in the direction of conservative honesty, writes Jacob Weisberg.

5. London and Team GB – take a bow. You’ve dazzled the world (Daily Telegraph)

This glorious festival hasn’t changed us, but it has shown just what we’re capable of, says Boris Johnson.

6. GB shows we can truly excel (Sun)

As a nation we can win gold as a global trading nation freed from the tentacles of European bureaucracy, says Trevor Kavanagh.

7. Cameron must now embrace the spirit of the Games (Independent)

The Olympics should inspire the PM to be bold – and to return to the themes of the Big Society, says Ian Birrell.

8. Our new approach to aid is a worthy legacy (Daily Telegraph)

We must harness the Olympic spirit to stop hunger blighting the lives of millions, argues Michael Howard.

9. Assad’s fall presents Turkey with another dilemma (Financial Times)

Erdogan’s efforts to address Kurdish grievances are no longer enough, writes David Gardner.

10. The Beastie Boy who really is a role model – to rock stars (Guardian)

Beastie Boy Adam Yauch's will refuses permission for his music to feature in ads, writes John Harris. Even the Clash couldn't manage that.

Getty
Show Hide image

Jeremy Corbyn will stay on the Labour leadership ballot paper, judge rules

Labour donor Michael Foster had challenged the decision at the High Court.

The High Court has ruled that Jeremy Corbyn should be allowed to automatically run again for Labour leader after the decision of the party's National Executive Committee was challenged. 

Corbyn declared it a "waste of time" and an attempt to overturn the right of Labour members to choose their leader.

The decision ends the hope of some anti-Corbyn Labour members that he could be excluded from the contest altogether.

The legal challenge had been brought by Michael Foster, a Labour donor and former parliamentary candidate, who maintained he was simply seeking the views of experts.

But when the experts spoke, it was in Corbyn's favour. 

The ruling said: "Accordingly, the Judge accepted that the decision of the NEC was correct and that Mr Corbyn was entitled to be a candidate in the forthcoming election without the need for nominations."

This judgement was "wholly unaffected by political considerations", it added. 

Corbyn said: "I welcome the decision by the High Court to respect the democracy of the Labour Party.

"This has been a waste of time and resources when our party should be focused on holding the government to account.

"There should have been no question of the right of half a million Labour party members to choose their own leader being overturned. If anything, the aim should be to expand the number of voters in this election. I hope all candidates and supporters will reject any attempt to prolong this process, and that we can now proceed with the election in a comradely and respectful manner."

Iain McNicol, general secretary of the Labour Party, said: “We are delighted that the Court has upheld the authority and decision of the National Executive Committee of the Labour Party. 

“We will continue with the leadership election as agreed by the NEC."

If Corbyn had been excluded, he would have had to seek the nomination of 51 MPs, which would have been difficult since just 40 voted against the no confidence motion in him. He would therefore have been effectively excluded from running. 

Owen Smith, the candidate backed by rebel MPs, told the BBC earlier he believed Corbyn should stay on the ballot paper. 

He said after the judgement: “I’m pleased the court has done the right thing and ruled that Jeremy should be on the ballot. This now puts to bed any questions about the process, so we can get on with discussing the issues that really matter."

The news was greeted with celebration by Corbyn supporters.