Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Mo Farah's joyful embrace of Britishness points the way to a more integrated future (Daily Mail)

The Games showed this country’s diverse identity in its very best light, made and re-made by natives and strangers through sheer determination, writes Yasmin Alibhai-Brown.

2. Give John Major the credit he's due (Guardian)

As we celebrate Team GB's Olympic success, spare a thought for the 'unknown prime minister' who made it possible, says Geoffrey Wheatcroft.

3. Not a Palin, but still a gamble: meet Paul Ryan (Times) (£)

Mitt Romney’s running-mate will make the election a contest between two visions, not just a referendum on Obama, writes Tim Montgomerie.

4. A principled but doomed running mate (Financial Times)

Ryan represents a big step in the direction of conservative honesty, writes Jacob Weisberg.

5. London and Team GB – take a bow. You’ve dazzled the world (Daily Telegraph)

This glorious festival hasn’t changed us, but it has shown just what we’re capable of, says Boris Johnson.

6. GB shows we can truly excel (Sun)

As a nation we can win gold as a global trading nation freed from the tentacles of European bureaucracy, says Trevor Kavanagh.

7. Cameron must now embrace the spirit of the Games (Independent)

The Olympics should inspire the PM to be bold – and to return to the themes of the Big Society, says Ian Birrell.

8. Our new approach to aid is a worthy legacy (Daily Telegraph)

We must harness the Olympic spirit to stop hunger blighting the lives of millions, argues Michael Howard.

9. Assad’s fall presents Turkey with another dilemma (Financial Times)

Erdogan’s efforts to address Kurdish grievances are no longer enough, writes David Gardner.

10. The Beastie Boy who really is a role model – to rock stars (Guardian)

Beastie Boy Adam Yauch's will refuses permission for his music to feature in ads, writes John Harris. Even the Clash couldn't manage that.

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What will Labour's new awkward squad do next?

What does the future hold for the party's once-rising-stars?

For years, Jeremy Corbyn was John McDonnell’s only friend in Parliament. Now, Corbyn is the twice-elected Labour leader, and McDonnell his shadow chancellor. The crushing leadership election victory has confirmed Corbyn-supporting MPs as the new Labour elite. It has also created a new awkward squad.   

Some MPs – including some vocal critics of Corbyn – are queuing up to get back in the shadow cabinet (one, Sarah Champion, returned during the leadership contest). Chi Onwurah, who spoke out on Corbyn’s management style, never left. But others, most notably the challenger Owen Smith, are resigning themselves to life on the back benches. 

So what is a once-rising-star MP to do? The most obvious choice is to throw yourself into the issue the Corbyn leadership doesn’t want to talk about – Brexit. The most obvious platform to do so on is a select committee. Chuka Umunna has founded Vote Leave Watch, a campaign group, and is running to replace Keith Vaz on the Home Affairs elect committee. Emma Reynolds, a former shadow Europe minister, is running alongside Hilary Benn to sit on the newly-created Brexit committee. 

Then there is the written word - so long as what you write is controversial enough. Rachel Reeves caused a stir when she described control on freedom of movement as “a red line” in Brexit negotiations. Keir Starmer is still planning to publish his long-scheduled immigration report. Alison McGovern embarked on a similar tour of the country

Other MPs have thrown themselves into campaigns, most notably refugee rights. Stella Creasy is working with Alf Dubs on his amendment to protect child refugees. Yvette Cooper chairs Labour's refugee taskforce.

The debate about whether Labour MPs should split altogether is ongoing, but the warnings of history aside, some Corbyn critics believe this is exactly what the leadership would like them to do. Richard Angell, deputy director of Progress, a centrist group, said: “Parts of the Labour project get very frustrated that good people Labour activists are staying in the party.”

One reason to stay in Labour is the promise of a return of shadow cabinet elections, a decision currently languishing with the National Executive Committee. 

But anti-Corbyn MPs may still yet find their ability to influence policies blocked. Even if the decision goes ahead, the Corbyn leadership is understood to be planning a root and branch reform of party institutions, to be announced in the late autumn. If it is consistent with his previous rhetoric, it will hand more power to the pro-Corbyn grassroots members. The members of Labour's new awkward squad have seized on elections as a way to legitimise their voices. But with Corbyn in charge, they might get more democracy than they bargained for.