Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Mo Farah's joyful embrace of Britishness points the way to a more integrated future (Daily Mail)

The Games showed this country’s diverse identity in its very best light, made and re-made by natives and strangers through sheer determination, writes Yasmin Alibhai-Brown.

2. Give John Major the credit he's due (Guardian)

As we celebrate Team GB's Olympic success, spare a thought for the 'unknown prime minister' who made it possible, says Geoffrey Wheatcroft.

3. Not a Palin, but still a gamble: meet Paul Ryan (Times) (£)

Mitt Romney’s running-mate will make the election a contest between two visions, not just a referendum on Obama, writes Tim Montgomerie.

4. A principled but doomed running mate (Financial Times)

Ryan represents a big step in the direction of conservative honesty, writes Jacob Weisberg.

5. London and Team GB – take a bow. You’ve dazzled the world (Daily Telegraph)

This glorious festival hasn’t changed us, but it has shown just what we’re capable of, says Boris Johnson.

6. GB shows we can truly excel (Sun)

As a nation we can win gold as a global trading nation freed from the tentacles of European bureaucracy, says Trevor Kavanagh.

7. Cameron must now embrace the spirit of the Games (Independent)

The Olympics should inspire the PM to be bold – and to return to the themes of the Big Society, says Ian Birrell.

8. Our new approach to aid is a worthy legacy (Daily Telegraph)

We must harness the Olympic spirit to stop hunger blighting the lives of millions, argues Michael Howard.

9. Assad’s fall presents Turkey with another dilemma (Financial Times)

Erdogan’s efforts to address Kurdish grievances are no longer enough, writes David Gardner.

10. The Beastie Boy who really is a role model – to rock stars (Guardian)

Beastie Boy Adam Yauch's will refuses permission for his music to feature in ads, writes John Harris. Even the Clash couldn't manage that.

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PMQs review: Jeremy Corbyn turns "the nasty party" back on Theresa May

The Labour leader exploited Conservative splits over disability benefits.

It didn't take long for Theresa May to herald the Conservatives' Copeland by-election victory at PMQs (and one couldn't blame her). But Jeremy Corbyn swiftly brought her down to earth. The Labour leader denounced the government for "sneaking out" its decision to overrule a court judgement calling for Personal Independence Payments (PIPs) to be extended to those with severe mental health problems.

Rather than merely expressing his own outrage, Corbyn drew on that of others. He smartly quoted Tory backbencher Heidi Allen, one of the tax credit rebels, who has called on May to "think agan" and "honour" the court's rulings. The Prime Minister protested that the government was merely returning PIPs to their "original intention" and was already spending more than ever on those with mental health conditions. But Corbyn had more ammunition, denouncing Conservative policy chair George Freeman for his suggestion that those "taking pills" for anxiety aren't "really disabled". After May branded Labour "the nasty party" in her conference speech, Corbyn suggested that the Tories were once again worthy of her epithet.

May emphasised that Freeman had apologised and, as so often, warned that the "extra support" promised by Labour would be impossible without the "strong economy" guaranteed by the Conservatives. "The one thing we know about Labour is that they would bankrupt Britain," she declared. Unlike on previous occasions, Corbyn had a ready riposte, reminding the Tories that they had increased the national debt by more than every previous Labour government.

But May saved her jibe of choice for the end, recalling shadow cabinet minister Cat Smith's assertion that the Copeland result was an "incredible achivement" for her party. "I think that word actually sums up the Right Honourable Gentleman's leadership. In-cred-ible," May concluded, with a rather surreal Thatcher-esque flourish.

Yet many economists and EU experts say the same of her Brexit plan. Having repeatedly hailed the UK's "strong economy" (which has so far proved resilient), May had better hope that single market withdrawal does not wreck it. But on Brexit, as on disability benefits, it is Conservative rebels, not Corbyn, who will determine her fate.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.