Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Immigration policy goes against our universities (Financial Times)

Revoking LMU’s licence to sponsor visas will have damaging implications, writes Richard Lambert.

2. As Ed Miliband knows, Labour must forgive the Lib Dems (Guardian)

The party should have embraced Nick Clegg's wealth tax proposals, isolating the Tories on the failing economy, writes Polly Toynbee.

3. Lib Dems can’t just leap into bed with Labour (Times) (£)

Principles matter in politics, writes Roy Hattersley. A party seen to switch sides out of self-interest is doomed.

4. Immigration is not just a numbers game (Daily Telegraph)

The system is rejecting many immigrants who would benefit the country, says a Daily Telegraph editorial.

5. Liberal Democrats must back Nick Clegg and let him finish the job (Guardian)

The Lib Dem leader challenged us to change from a party of opposition to one capable of carrying the burdens of government, says Paddy Ashdown.

6. Cameron’s English lesson for the French president (Financial Times)

Circumstance demands a strategist, writes Philip Stephens. Hollande, like the British prime minister, looks too much the tactician.

7. What the court battle of the oligarchs says about Britain (Independent)

Why can someone shovel cash into the UK without any enquiry into its provenance, asks Mary Dejevsky.

8. Paralympics opening enlightened the world (Daily Telegraph)

The Paralympics opening ceremony showcased the individuality and ingenuity that continues to make our nation great, says Melvyn Bragg.

9. R.I.P. Sir Rhodes Boyson - the cabinet needs working-class heroes like you (Daily Mail)

If the Prime Minister fancies a second term of office, he’d better promote a Rhodes Boyson or two, says Tom Utley.

 

10. Cameron and Obama could soon be drowning in debt (Daily Telegraph)

The voters will not be placated for ever by governments that fail to deliver on their word, writes Fraser Nelson.

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Italian PM Matteo Renzi resigns after referendum No vote

Europe's right-wing populists cheered the result. 

Italy's centrist Prime Minister Matteo Renzi was forced to resign late on Sunday after he lost a referendum on constitutional change.

With most ballots counted, 60 per cent of Italians voted No to change, according to the BBC. The turn out was nearly 70 per cent. 

Voters were asked whether they backed a reform to Italy's complex political system, but right-wing populists have interpreted the referendum as a wider poll on the direction of the country.

Before the result, former Ukip leader Nigel Farage tweeted: "Hope the exit polls in Italy are right. This vote looks to me to be more about the Euro than constitutional change."

The leader of France's far-right Front National, Marine Le Pen, tweeted "bravo" to her Eurosceptic "friend" Matteo Salvini, a politician who campaigned for the No vote. She described the referendum result as a "thirst for liberty". 

In his resignation speech, Renzi told reporters he took responsibility for the outcome and added "good luck to us all". 

Since gaining office in 2014, Renzi has been a reformist politician. He introduced same-sex civil unions, made employment laws more flexible and abolished small taxes, and was known by some as "Europe's last Blairite".

However, his proposed constitutional reforms divided opinion even among liberals, because of the way they removed certain checks and balances and handed increased power to the government.

 

Julia Rampen is the editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog. She was previously deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines.