Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. A third runway must be cleared for take-off (Daily Telegraph)

I backed Cameron on Heathrow to save the environment – but the facts have changed, says Tim Yeo.

2. This election could be Republicans’ last chance (Financial Times)

An inability to attract the votes of ethnic minorities in general – and Hispanics in particular – is a big disadvantage to the Republicans, writes Gideon Rachman.

3. Along with the Arctic ice, the rich world's smugness will melt (Guardian)

The belief that Europe and America will be hit least by climate change is in ruins, writes George Monbiot. Yet all we do is try to profit from disaster.

4. It’s not just rednecks who’ll vote for Romney (Times) (£)

Step outside the media-academic cocoon and you find plenty of Americans who resent being told they’re bigots, writes John O'Sullivan.

5. Osborne should fear angry Tory outriders (Financial Times)

Those on the right of the party do not reward concessions; they pocket them and ask for more, says Janan Ganesh.

6. The toxic world of globalised healthcare is upon us (Guardian)

Staff wages and benefits eroded through privatisation is nothing compared to what is in store for patients, warns Allyson Pollock.

7. Camera phones aren't just for peep shows (Independent)

Though unnerved by a world without privacy, I admit camera phones bring more benefit than harm, says Dominic Lawson.

8. What makes a doctor become a terrorist? (Daily Mail)

It is to this country’s shame that it has become a leading exporter of jihadi sympathisers, writes Michael Burleigh.

9. We need great speeches in this time of national drama (Guardian)

Amid the government's injustice and class bias, people want to see their deep anger reflected by opposition politicians, says Polly Toynbee.

10. Despite the crisis, Britons are still spending like drunkards (Daily Telegraph)

Unchecked addiction to personal and national debt is robbing our children of their future, argues Jeff Randall.

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The big problem for the NHS? Local government cuts

Even a U-Turn on planned cuts to the service itself will still leave the NHS under heavy pressure. 

38Degrees has uncovered a series of grisly plans for the NHS over the coming years. Among the highlights: severe cuts to frontline services at the Midland Metropolitan Hospital, including but limited to the closure of its Accident and Emergency department. Elsewhere, one of three hospitals in Leicester, Leicestershire and Rutland are to be shuttered, while there will be cuts to acute services in Suffolk and North East Essex.

These cuts come despite an additional £8bn annual cash injection into the NHS, characterised as the bare minimum needed by Simon Stevens, the head of NHS England.

The cuts are outlined in draft sustainability and transformation plans (STP) that will be approved in October before kicking off a period of wider consultation.

The problem for the NHS is twofold: although its funding remains ringfenced, healthcare inflation means that in reality, the health service requires above-inflation increases to stand still. But the second, bigger problem aren’t cuts to the NHS but to the rest of government spending, particularly local government cuts.

That has seen more pressure on hospital beds as outpatients who require further non-emergency care have nowhere to go, increasing lifestyle problems as cash-strapped councils either close or increase prices at subsidised local authority gyms, build on green space to make the best out of Britain’s booming property market, and cut other corners to manage the growing backlog of devolved cuts.

All of which means even a bigger supply of cash for the NHS than the £8bn promised at the last election – even the bonanza pledged by Vote Leave in the referendum, in fact – will still find itself disappearing down the cracks left by cuts elsewhere. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. He usually writes about politics.