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Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

New Statesman

1. A third runway must be cleared for take-off (Daily Telegraph)

I backed Cameron on Heathrow to save the environment – but the facts have changed, says Tim Yeo.

2. This election could be Republicans’ last chance (Financial Times)

An inability to attract the votes of ethnic minorities in general – and Hispanics in particular – is a big disadvantage to the Republicans, writes Gideon Rachman.

3. Along with the Arctic ice, the rich world's smugness will melt (Guardian)

The belief that Europe and America will be hit least by climate change is in ruins, writes George Monbiot. Yet all we do is try to profit from disaster.

4. It’s not just rednecks who’ll vote for Romney (Times) (£)

Step outside the media-academic cocoon and you find plenty of Americans who resent being told they’re bigots, writes John O'Sullivan.

5. Osborne should fear angry Tory outriders (Financial Times)

Those on the right of the party do not reward concessions; they pocket them and ask for more, says Janan Ganesh.

6. The toxic world of globalised healthcare is upon us (Guardian)

Staff wages and benefits eroded through privatisation is nothing compared to what is in store for patients, warns Allyson Pollock.

7. Camera phones aren't just for peep shows (Independent)

Though unnerved by a world without privacy, I admit camera phones bring more benefit than harm, says Dominic Lawson.

8. What makes a doctor become a terrorist? (Daily Mail)

It is to this country’s shame that it has become a leading exporter of jihadi sympathisers, writes Michael Burleigh.

9. We need great speeches in this time of national drama (Guardian)

Amid the government's injustice and class bias, people want to see their deep anger reflected by opposition politicians, says Polly Toynbee.

10. Despite the crisis, Britons are still spending like drunkards (Daily Telegraph)

Unchecked addiction to personal and national debt is robbing our children of their future, argues Jeff Randall.