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Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

New Statesman

1. Getting rid of Dubya wasn't enough. The US remains a bully (Independent)

The issue isn't Obama, any more than it was Bush before him. The issue is US power, writes Owen Jones.

2.  The reshuffle question that Cameron and Clegg cannot afford not to ask (Guardian)

If this is the last chance before 2015 to revive the coalition's fortunes, then the case to ditch Osborne is daring but strong, writes Martin Kettle.

3. MPs must ensure no one else is denied the right to die (Independent)

Tony Nicklinson survived only days after the high court refused his plea for medical help to commit suicide and his death can only be described as a merciful deliverance, writes The Independent.

4. A people’s revolution is under way in the fight against crime (Telegraph)

Britain is leading the world with elected commissioners and a new College of Policing, writes

5. The fight for control of the internet has become critical (Guardian)

If plans to put cyberspace under a secretive UN agency go through, states' censoring of the web will be globally enshrined, writes John Kampfner.

6. Harry, a truly modern prince made flesh (Independent)

This will do his reputation no harm - he's the most excitingly debauched Royal since Henry VIII, writes Harriet Walker.

7. Asil Nadir: still guilty, then, after all these years (Guardian)

The disgraced Polly Peck tycoon expected a more sympathetic hearing. But demands for justice have only grown stronger

8. He wanted to die, but he also wanted to leave a legacy in law (Independent)

Within a few months of his stroke, Tony Nicklinson talked of wanting to die. His family knew locked-in life would never be enough, writes Nina Lakhani.

Save us from actors with delusions of grandeur (Telegraph)

The 'New Tricks’ thespians who think they write the scripts are kidding themselves, writes

Prince Harry: Conduct unbecoming (Telegraph)

The Prince’s disgraceful behaviour in a Las Vegas hotel room ignored the duty he owes to two respected institutions – the Royal family and the Army. He should know better, writes Peter Oborne.