Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Nothing can be made cheaper painlessly (Independent)

Ed Miliband implies we should be affronted that in a recession people find it harder to make ends meet, writes John Rentoul

2. It's been a long time coming, but at last they're reining in the chuggers, the scourge of our high streets (Independent)

The girls extract money through tactical simpering, the boys favour an Elizabethan fool-style jiggle, writes Grace Dent.

3. Exporting the NHS won't make it better (Independent)

The NHS has a global reputation not because it's a brand, but because it's free, writes Mark Steel.

4. Don't lose sight of why the US is out to get Julian Assange (Guardian)

Ecuador is pressing for a deal that offers justice to Assange's accusers – and essential protection for whistleblowers

5. The west's hypocrisy over Pussy Riot is breathtaking (Guardian)

Our courts now jail at the drop of a headline – for stealing water or abuse sent on Twitter. So who are we to condemn Russia?

6. Everyone's talking about rape (Guardian)

So why do so few of these commentators appear to have the first clue what it actually is? Writes Hadley Freeman.

7. Honours: how to decide who deserves that little extra (Telegraph)

Our honours system will never satisfy everyone, but it meets an important need, writes Douglas Hurd.

8. Forget the politics and build George Orwell a statue (Telegraph)

The greatest British journalist of his day should be honoured at the BBC’s new Broadcasting House, writes Joan Bakewell.

9. Why do we need to pay billions of pounds for big projects? (Financial Times)

The current estimate for the cost of the Olympics in 2012 is £11bn, writes John Kay.

10. George Galloway, Todd Akin and other male politicians still getting it wrong on rape. (Telegraph)

Women are fed up with male politicians on both sides of the Atlantic diminishing this serious crime, writes Louise Mench.

 

Matt Cardy/Getty Images
Show Hide image

What did Jeremy Corbyn really say about Bin Laden?

He's been critiqued for calling Bin Laden's death a "tragedy". But what did Jeremy Corbyn really say?

Jeremy Corbyn is under fire for describing Bin Laden’s death as a “tragedy” in the Sun, but what did the Labour leadership frontrunner really say?

In remarks made to Press TV, the state-backed Iranian broadcaster, the Islington North MP said:

“This was an assassination attempt, and is yet another tragedy, upon a tragedy, upon a tragedy. The World Trade Center was a tragedy, the attack on Afghanistan was a tragedy, the war in Iraq was a tragedy. Tens of thousands of people have died.”

He also added that it was his preference that Osama Bin Laden be put on trial, a view shared by, among other people, Barack Obama and Boris Johnson.

Although Andy Burnham, one of Corbyn’s rivals for the leadership, will later today claim that “there is everything to play for” in the contest, with “tens of thousands still to vote”, the row is unlikely to harm Corbyn’s chances of becoming Labour leader. 

Stephen Bush is editor of the Staggers, the New Statesman’s political blog.