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Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

New Statesman

1. The busted British economy needs more than just Olympic spirit (Guardian)

If the Games taught us anything it is that daring to be different can work, writes Simon Jenkins. Let's take the same approach to stimulus.

2. Why the coalition could learn a lot from Ryanonomics (Daily Telegraph)

The contrast between the policies developed by Ryan and those proposed by George Osborne is astonishing, says Allister Heath.

3. Has Obama just been handed victory on a plate? (Independent)

Romney may wish to frame the election as a choice about the budget, writes Matthew Norman. But the true battle is ideological.

4. The Bo Xilai and Gu Kailai scandal masks the battle for China's future (Guardian)

The melodrama of Bo Xilai's fall has been used to press for privatisation, but the global crisis demands an alternative, says Seumas Milne.

5. It's Cameron's "decent, working families" who will suffer if he relaxes Sunday trading laws (Daily Mail)

The real issue here is the Prime Minister's contempt for religion in general and the Church of England in particular, says George Pitcher.

6. Academic rigour is liberating not limiting (Times) (£)

Tomorrow’s A-level results will show we’ve buried the nonsense about child-centred learning, says Michael Gove.

7. A blueprint for continued sporting success (Financial Times)

Getting money is the easy bit – results are harder to come by, writes James Purnell.

8. Under Rowan Williams, the church has failed gay people (Guardian)

Tragically, the Archbishop changed his public position as soon as he reached the throne of St Augustine, writes Jeffrey John.

9. This is not the time to put the brakes on reforming the state (Daily Telegraph)

Private companies can deliver key services as reliably as the public sector, and at lower cost, argues Andrew Haldenby.

10. Why I work on my summer holiday (Financial Times)

Quite how workaholic we really are is a matter of perspective, writes Sebastian Mallaby.