Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Lords reform: we'll defeat the rebels (Guardian)

Progressives have waited a century for Lords reform, writes Charles Kennedy. Will Labour vote tonight to restore faith in politics?

2. True Conservatives reject the Lords reform Bill (Daily Telegraph)

The Tory MPs opposing the coalition’s vandalism of the Lords cannot be described as "rebels", argues Iain Martin.

3. Vickers is not enough to stop another Libor scandal (Financial Times)

The report fails to identify the root causes of the financial crisis – opacity and leverage, writes Laurence Kotlikoff.

4. The Arab Spring’s spirit still burns in Libya (Daily Telegraph)

Against expectations, elections were free and peaceful, says Shashank Joshi.

5. Only the state can provide the care we need in old age (Guardian)

It's an inconvenient truth for George Osborne but the numbers don't lie: privately we can't afford to look after ourselves, says Polly Toynbee.

6. Civil society has slipped into a state of decay (Times) (£)

True citizens do more than vote and pay taxes, writes Niall Ferguson. They, not the state, prevent an uncivil society.

7. Defections and revolts expose the Assads (Financial Times)

While there have been no cases of units switching sides, the trickle is now a steady stream, writes David Gardner.

8. Our paranoia is a victory for terror (Independent)

Authorities have a vested interest in inflating national anxiety, says Yasmin Alibhai-Brown.

9. The military must invade our schools (Daily Telegraph)

We should enhance the Forces’ involvement in education, say Stephen Twigg and Jim Murphy.

10. It takes more than a stroke of genius to become a true champion (Independent)

Perhaps the idea of the effortless genius is born to reassure ourselves in our relative laziness, writes Dominic Lawson.

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5 scenarios that will definitely happen in Ukip Britain

The Ukip general election 2017 manifesto is out. 

On 8 June 2017, Ukip defied expectations and pulled off a 392 majority in the general election. Prime Minister Paul Nuttall swiftly enacted his manifesto pledges – all 63 pages of them.

Now, thanks to Ukip, Britons no longer have to worry about silly things like the EU and multiculturalism. But not everyone has managed to adjust immediately to the Brexit paradise.

1. The beekeeper

Tommy knew right away his bees weren’t happy. They were swarming all over him, buzzing like a razor on a rampage, ready to sting. It was just as well he was wearing his beekeeping suit.

Except, wait a minute? Hadn’t the new Ukip government banned face coverings? Tommy was proud of being a law-abiding citizen. As he slowly removed his protective helmet, he shouted a parting message to his wife: “Enjoy our British honey when I’m gone.”

2. The job

“Thanks for coming,” Martin said to the three job applicants sitting in the glass-walled office. “I’m looking for someone who will be able to monitor the world’s FX markets, and identify any kind of insider trading.”

“I did my PhD in fraudulent FX and spent the last ten years tracking white collar criminals down,” said Gretchen.

“I’m a former trader who worked at three different central banks and makes my own beer on the side,” said Pierre.

“I’m young, unemployed, have no real qualifications to speak of and am under the age of 25,” said Stu. “I’m British.”

Martin shook Stu’s hand. “Welcome aboard,” he said.

3. The rescue

Stanley dodged the falling buildings as he made his way to the harbour, where a red-faced man in khaki was standing looking confused.

“Have you brought vital supplies?” Stanley shouted over the rumble of the earthquake.

“I’m from Britain and I’ve got nosh,” the man said.

“Nosh?” Stanley repeated. “What kind of country sends snacks to an impoverished country in the middle of an earthquake?”

“It’s the Naval Ocean-Going Surgical Hospital,” the man said. “We scrapped our foreign aid target.”

“Oh fuck off,” said Stanley.

4. The family

Helen knew something was different as soon as she stepped inside her parents’ house. “What have you changed this time?” she asked her octogenarian mother. “Is it the cushions? Did you give the door a fresh coat of paint?”

“No, darling,” her father said. “We just installed a sauna and hot tub complex along with an outdoor pool.”

Helen scratched her head. “I know Ukip has kept the triple lock pension guarantee,” she said. “But how can you possibly afford it?”

Her parents giggled so hard Helen began to worry they were having seizures. “Haven’t you heard of inheritable mortgages?” her mother managed to say. “One day, all this debt will be yours.”

5. The clouds

Ronald rubbed his eyes, and peered through the window again. No, he wasn’t seeing things. There was no sun. He stepped out of the house and stared at the sky. Where the bloody hell was it?

Then he remembered the referendum the month before. It had asked Gibraltarians if they wanted to be truly British, and he had ticked yes.

It began to rain.

Julia Rampen is the digital news editor of the New Statesman (previously editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog). She has also been deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines. 

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