Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Lords reform: we'll defeat the rebels (Guardian)

Progressives have waited a century for Lords reform, writes Charles Kennedy. Will Labour vote tonight to restore faith in politics?

2. True Conservatives reject the Lords reform Bill (Daily Telegraph)

The Tory MPs opposing the coalition’s vandalism of the Lords cannot be described as "rebels", argues Iain Martin.

3. Vickers is not enough to stop another Libor scandal (Financial Times)

The report fails to identify the root causes of the financial crisis – opacity and leverage, writes Laurence Kotlikoff.

4. The Arab Spring’s spirit still burns in Libya (Daily Telegraph)

Against expectations, elections were free and peaceful, says Shashank Joshi.

5. Only the state can provide the care we need in old age (Guardian)

It's an inconvenient truth for George Osborne but the numbers don't lie: privately we can't afford to look after ourselves, says Polly Toynbee.

6. Civil society has slipped into a state of decay (Times) (£)

True citizens do more than vote and pay taxes, writes Niall Ferguson. They, not the state, prevent an uncivil society.

7. Defections and revolts expose the Assads (Financial Times)

While there have been no cases of units switching sides, the trickle is now a steady stream, writes David Gardner.

8. Our paranoia is a victory for terror (Independent)

Authorities have a vested interest in inflating national anxiety, says Yasmin Alibhai-Brown.

9. The military must invade our schools (Daily Telegraph)

We should enhance the Forces’ involvement in education, say Stephen Twigg and Jim Murphy.

10. It takes more than a stroke of genius to become a true champion (Independent)

Perhaps the idea of the effortless genius is born to reassure ourselves in our relative laziness, writes Dominic Lawson.

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Work with us: Wellcome Scholarship at the New Statesman

Be one of our 2016 science interns.

Britain needs more great science writers – particularly from backgrounds which have been traditionally under-represented in the media.

To address this, the New Statesman and Wellcome Trust, in partnership with Creative Access, have come together to offer annual placements to student or graduates from an ethnic minority background*.

The final 2016 placement will take place this Autumn/Winter (the exact date is flexible) and will last for four weeks.

Over the course of the placement, the successful applicants will:

  • Work alongside the New Statesman web and magazine team, learning about the editorial and production process, and how articles are conceived, written, edited and laid out;
  • Undertake a data-driven journalism research project on a scientific topic, which will be published on the New Statesman website
  • Visit Parliament and learn about how science-based legislation is developed and debated in the select committee system
  • Have an opportunity to interview a leading scientist or policy-maker
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  • Receive regular feedback and editing from the editorial team
  • Meet journalists at other titles in the sector (previous Wellcome Scholars have met writers for the Atlantic, and presenters for the BBC)

Over the course of the placement, you will be paid London living wage.

To apply for the placement, follow the steps below and apply direct to the New Statesman. 

Please write an 800-word blogpost on a recent or upcoming scientific development which you feel has the potential to change lives significantly, explaining clearly and concisely what stage the research is at, and how it is likely to proceed. It should be written as if for the NS audience - interested, intelligent laypeople.

Please also write up to 200 words on why you are right for this placement and what you would hope to get out of it. You don't need to send a CV.

Please only use Word files, or paste your text into the body of an email. 

Send your application by email to Helen Lewis (Helen @ newstatesman co uk) with the subject line “Wellcome Scholarship 2016”. 

Applications close on 30 September 2016. Interviews will take place soon after.

This is a positive action scheme under the Race Relations Act.