Cameron left his daughter in a pub

The reaction from most will be one of sympathy.

The news that David Cameron accidentally left his eight-year old daughter in a pub, coinciding as it does with the re-launch of the government's "troubled families" programme, has provoked much amusement this morning.

The mix-up apparently occurred after Cameron's daughter, Nancy, wandered off to the toilets while he and Samantha were arranging lifts. Both then wrongly assumed that she was with the other parent (Cameron travelled home separately with his bodyguards) and only realised their mistake when they returned to Chequers. Cameron then rushed back to the Plough Inn in Cadsden, Buckinghamshire, where he found his daughter with staff. She was away from her parents for around 15 minutes.

A Downing Street spokesman said: "The prime minister and Samantha were distraught when they realised Nancy wasn't with them.

"Thankfully when they phoned the pub she was there safe and well.

"The prime minister went down straight away to get her."

The reaction from some will be one of incredulity (how did Cameron's security detail not notice?) but I suspect most parents will feel great sympathy for the Camerons. The terror of misplacing a child (well-described in the opening of Ian McEwan's The Child in Time), even briefly, is one that those who have experienced it will never forget.

"Are we missing something?" Photograph: Getty Images.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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Benn vs McDonnell: how Brexit has exposed the fight over Labour's party machine

In the wake of Brexit, should Labour MPs listen more closely to voters, or their own party members?

Two Labour MPs on primetime TV. Two prominent politicians ruling themselves out of a Labour leadership contest. But that was as far as the similarity went.

Hilary Benn was speaking hours after he resigned - or was sacked - from the Shadow Cabinet. He described Jeremy Corbyn as a "good and decent man" but not a leader.

Framing his overnight removal as a matter of conscience, Benn told the BBC's Andrew Marr: "I no longer have confidence in him [Corbyn] and I think the right thing to do would be for him to take that decision."

In Benn's view, diehard leftie pin ups do not go down well in the real world, or on the ballot papers of middle England. 

But while Benn may be drawing on a New Labour truism, this in turn rests on the assumption that voters matter more than the party members when it comes to winning elections.

That assumption was contested moments later by Shadow Chancellor John McDonnell.

Dismissive of the personal appeal of Shadow Cabinet ministers - "we can replace them" - McDonnell's message was that Labour under Corbyn had rejuvenated its electoral machine.

Pointing to success in by-elections and the London mayoral election, McDonnell warned would-be rebels: "Who is sovereign in our party? The people who are soverign are the party members. 

"I'm saying respect the party members. And in that way we can hold together and win the next election."

Indeed, nearly a year on from Corbyn's surprise election to the Labour leadership, it is worth remembering he captured nearly 60% of the 400,000 votes cast. Momentum, the grassroots organisation formed in the wake of his success, now has more than 50 branches around the country.

Come the next election, it will be these grassroots members who will knock on doors, hand out leaflets and perhaps even threaten to deselect MPs.

The question for wavering Labour MPs will be whether what they trust more - their own connection with voters, or this potentially unbiddable party machine.