Banker-hatred expresses a longer, deeper crisis

Financiers' immunity from justice mirrors their insulation from recession.

Why are we so outraged by the Barclays-Libor affair? Silly question really. It is scandalous that traders appear to have manipulated a fundamental market-making interest rate in pursuit of a quick profit. It is emblematic of habits and ethics that steered the British economy onto the rocks in 2007-08. The detail of the story – the brazen emails that lay bare the scam – exude the arrogant sense of entitlement that presents the protagonists in a repulsive light. And it reminds us, when we see Bob Diamond, conspicuously unburdened by judicial investigation or conscience, that the caste of people with the strongest claim to have caused the financial crisis are the same ones who seem least afflicted by its consequences. That provokes our natural sense of injustice.

But there is another layer to public feeling about this issue. It was the subject of an event I attended this morning at the Resolution Foundation, the consistently excellent think tank that dedicates a lot of thought to the problems facing low-to-middle income households. They are famously squeezed (the low-to-middle income households, that is; Resolution are hardly even cramped in their lovely spacious West End office and, outside of Westminster, are not all that famous).

The key observation contained in Resolution analysis – available on their website – is that wages and earnings for most people in Britain stopped growing some time in the middle of the last decade. As the cost of basic goods and services has risen, a process accelerated by some painful bursts of inflation in the last couple of years, people are struggling to keep their heads above the water. Crucially, this process started before the crash and before the recession. It is also a phenomenon recorded in many other developed economies and is especially pronounced and protracted in the US. (For a brilliant account of how wage stagnation is hollowing out the American middle class, read this essay by Ed Luce in the Financial Times. Behind a paywall, sadly.)

In the UK, the trend for decline in wages and the attendant slide in living standards was held back by the growth of tax credits. Shadow Chief Secretary Rachel Reeves spoke at this morning’s event and mounted a vigorous defence of tax credits – generally scorned by the coalition as a tool of deranged Brownian micro-management and first in line for cuts. The other way Britons topped up stagnant wages was private sector borrowing: credit cards, store cards, re-mortgaging, high street lending etc. That, needless to say, was not a terribly sustainable route to prosperity.

An important point that Resolution make (and that Reeves touched on but with characteristic caution) is that, when growth returns to the UK economy, there is no reason why it should do so in a way that solves the longer term structural squeeze on incomes. This is not some abstract question of economic balances. It is probably the issue that will decide the next election. On current trajectories, the overwhelming portion of British voters will reach 2015 feeling poorer, less secure in their jobs - if they have one - and less hopeful for the future than they did in 2010. And that is true even if the economy is growing.

Downing Street are alert to the problem. One reason why fuel duty rises were scrapped this week is that David Cameron and George Osborne badly need to find ways to signal that they have noticed how hard many people are finding it to make ends meet.

One Number 10 advisor told me recently of his conviction that politics for the next decade will come to be dominated by the decline in living standards for ordinary households and the question “so what are you going to about it?” I think he is probably right.

And it is against that backdrop that the Barclays scandal has to be seen. It is not just offensive in some abstract judicial way. It isn’t just scandalous as a case of bad regulation and wickedness unpunished. Seeing what bankers have been up to and suspecting that they might get away with it, when they have escaped the financial consequences of their actions and preserved their rising incomes, is a vicious, sneering affront to the British people. Politics itself will be devalued - more than it already is - if it fails to offer an effective response to their anger.

Rafael Behr is political columnist at the Guardian and former political editor of the New Statesman

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In your 30s? You missed out on £26,000 and you're not even protesting

The 1980s kids seem resigned to their fate - for now. 

Imagine you’re in your thirties, and you’re renting in a shared house, on roughly the same pay you earned five years ago. Now imagine you have a friend, also in their thirties. This friend owns their own home, gets pay rises every year and has a more generous pension to beat. In fact, they are twice as rich as you. 

When you try to talk about how worried you are about your financial situation, the friend shrugs and says: “I was in that situation too.”

Un-friend, right? But this is, in fact, reality. A study from the Institute for Fiscal Studies found that Brits in their early thirties have a median wealth of £27,000. But ten years ago, a thirty something had £53,000. In other words, that unbearable friend is just someone exactly the same as you, who is now in their forties. 

Not only do Brits born in the early 1980s have half the wealth they would have had if they were born in the 1970s, but they are the first generation to be in this position since World War II.  According to the IFS study, each cohort has got progressively richer. But then, just as the 1980s kids were reaching adulthood, a couple of things happened at once.

House prices raced ahead of wages. Employers made pensions less generous. And, at the crucial point that the 1980s kids were finding their feet in the jobs market, the recession struck. The 1980s kids didn’t manage to buy homes in time to take advantage of low mortgage rates. Instead, they are stuck paying increasing amounts of rent. 

If the wealth distribution between someone in their 30s and someone in their 40s is stark, this is only the starting point in intergenerational inequality. The IFS expects pensioners’ incomes to race ahead of workers in the coming decade. 

So why, given this unprecedented reversal in fortunes, are Brits in their early thirties not marching in the streets? Why are they not burning tyres outside the Treasury while shouting: “Give us out £26k back?” 

The obvious fact that no one is going to be protesting their granny’s good fortune aside, it seems one reason for the 1980s kids’ resignation is they are still in denial. One thirty something wrote to The Staggers that the idea of being able to buy a house had become too abstract to worry about. Instead:

“You just try and get through this month and then worry about next month, which is probably self-defeating, but I think it's quite tough to get in the mindset that you're going to put something by so maybe in 10 years you can buy a shoebox a two-hour train ride from where you actually want to be.”

Another reflected that “people keep saying ‘something will turn up’”.

The Staggers turned to our resident thirty something, Yo Zushi, for his thoughts. He agreed with the IFS analysis that the recession mattered:

"We were spoiled by an artificially inflated balloon of cheap credit and growing up was something you did… later. Then the crash came in 2007-2008, and it became something we couldn’t afford to do. 

I would have got round to becoming comfortably off, I tell myself, had I been given another ten years of amoral capitalist boom to do so. Many of those who were born in the early 1970s drifted along, took a nap and woke up in possession of a house, all mod cons and a decent-paying job. But we slightly younger Gen X-ers followed in their slipstream and somehow fell off the edge. Oh well. "

Will the inertia of the1980s kids last? Perhaps – but Zushi sees in the support for Jeremy Corbyn, a swell of feeling at last. “Our lack of access to the life we were promised in our teens has woken many of us up to why things suck. That’s a good thing. 

“And now we have Corbyn to help sort it all out. That’s not meant sarcastically – I really think he’ll do it.”