Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Anders Breivik is a terrorist, so we should treat him like one (Guardian)

We comb over every word from Oslo, but disregard al-Qaida's rants. The lack of consistency speaks volumes, writes Jonathan Freedland

2. Cameron ‘secretly encouraged’ Tory backbench revolt on Lords reform (Times)

Sam Coates and Roland Watson accuse David Cameron of encouraging Conservative MPs to revolt against House of Lords reform.

3. This is politics not sport. If drivers can't see that, they are the pits (Independent)

"Supposing it was Assad shelling out £40m for a race. Would Ecclestone be happy to give him a soft sporting cover for his repression?", asks Robert Fisk.

4. Amiable apparatchik with eyes on the Elysée (Financial Times)

Hugh Carnegy writes that François Hollande’s transformation from virtual no-hoper to serious contender is partly a story of circumstance, partly a story of diligent preparation – and partly a story of the sheer unpopularity of Mr Sarkozy.

5. We should all be hacktivists now (Guardian)

Heather Brooke writes that in the state-orchestrated grab for cyber-territory we have to work together to ensure our online freedom is protected by law

6. The Tories' clustershambles is all very entertaining, but Cameron needs to get a grip (Independent)

Some leaders find immense extra physical and emotional resources in a crisis. They become more attentive to detail. But with Cameron, things seem to be going in the opposite direction, writes Chris Bryant

7. Battle is joined on bonuses – at long last (Financial Times)

John Plender writes that the amazing thing about the Barclays and Citi bonus fights is that it has taken so long for the worms of the institutional investment world to turn.

8. We can’t reform the European Court of Human Rights, so let’s end this nonsense (Daily Telegraph)

The interminable Abu Qatada affair proves Britain needs to bring home the rule of law, writes Charles Moore

9. At last Bahrain has found the friends it deserves (Guardian)

Marina Hyde writes that in John Yates and Bernie Ecclestone the charming al-Khalifas have met their match

10. Make the mayoral elections independents’ day (Independent)

As more cities opt for directly elected leaders we must make sure candidates of real character are heard above the din, writes Janice Turner

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

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Listen: Schools Minister Nick Gibb gets SATs question for 11-year-olds wrong

Exams put too much pressure on children. And on the politicians who insist they don't put too much pressure on children.

As we know from today's news of a primary school exams boycott, or "kids' strike", it's tough being a schoolchild in Britain today. But apparently it's also tough being a Schools Minister.

Nick Gibb, Minister of State at the Department for Education, failed a SATs grammar question for 11-year-olds on the BBC's World at One today. Having spent all morning defending the primary school exams system - criticised by tens of thousands of parents for putting too much pressure on young children - he fell victim to the very test that has come under fire.

Listen here:

Martha Kearney: Let me give you this sentence, “I went to the cinema after I’d eaten my dinner”. Is the word "after" there being used as a subordinating conjunction or as a preposition?

Nick Gibb: Well, it’s a proposition. “After” - it's...

MK: [Laughing]: I don’t think it is...

NG: “After” is a preposition, it can be used in some contexts as a, as a, word that coordinates a subclause, but this isn’t about me, Martha...

MK: No, I think, in this sentence it’s being used a subordinating conjunction!

NG: Fine. This isn’t about me. This is about ensuring that future generations of children, unlike me, incidentally, who was not taught grammar at primary school...

MK: Perhaps not!

NG: ...we need to make sure that future generations are taught grammar properly.

I'm a mole, innit.