Camden's burning

Last night's fire is a blow to Camden. But in re-development, it must retain its character

It’s Sunday and I’ve just been through Camden Town, on my way back home to Kentish Town from the Chinese New Year celebrations in Trafalgar Square and Chinatown. As I changed buses, I saw first-hand the massive amount of damage done to the canalside market by last night’s fire.

The destruction is extensive, and the danger from the damaged buildings so great that all the markets have been closed for the day. The police cordon extends most of the way down the roads leading away from the scene. As I walked over the canal to catch my bus home, I could see fire crews on cranes still pouring water over the gutted shops and market stalls, more than 18 hours after the fire started.

It was so sad to see one of my favourite parts of Camden in such a state. I have been talking up the excellence of its markets a lot lately, seeing as one of the standard Mayoral interview questions seems to be, ‘Where do you shop for clothes?’ (I do hope all the other candidates are getting that one). But of course it’s not just good for racks of second-hand bargain jackets; Camden’s markets support a wide range of entrepreneurs, artisans and craftspeople – unique small businesses that must all be suffering today.

It was a reminder, too, that we have to cherish the individuality of London’s various ‘urban villages’ - whether Camden Town or Chinatown - and support them, not take them for granted. The London Chinatown Chinese Association are doing a great job maintaining the spirit and character of their area, as shown by their tremendous work organising today’s celebrations. The stallholders and small business owners in Camden are similarly united as they find themselves under pressure from circling developers. I have joined them more than once in recent years to object to the encroachment of shiny new shopping centres into the area.

This latest blow is a challenge for all of to make sure the damaged buildings are restored for the benefit of the existing businesses and householders, and that this disaster is not used as an excuse for another characterless mall to spring up in their place.

Sian Berry lives in Kentish Town and was previously a principal speaker and campaigns co-ordinator for the Green Party. She was also their London mayoral candidate in 2008. She works as a writer and is a founder of the Alliance Against Urban 4x4s
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New Digital Editor: Serena Kutchinsky

The New Statesman appoints Serena Kutchinsky as Digital Editor.

Serena Kutchinsky is to join the New Statesman as digital editor in September. She will lead the expansion of the New Statesman across a variety of digital platforms.

Serena has over a decade of experience working in digital media and is currently the digital editor of Newsweek Europe. Since she joined the title, traffic to the website has increased by almost 250 per cent. Previously, Serena was the digital editor of Prospect magazine and also the assistant digital editor of the Sunday Times - part of the team which launched the Sunday Times website and tablet editions.

Jason Cowley, New Statesman editor, said: “Serena joins us at a great time for the New Statesman, and, building on the excellent work of recent years, she has just the skills and experience we need to help lead the next stage of our expansion as a print-digital hybrid.”

Serena Kutchinsky said: “I am delighted to be joining the New Statesman team and to have the opportunity to drive forward its digital strategy. The website is already established as the home of free-thinking journalism online in the UK and I look forward to leading our expansion and growing the global readership of this historic title.

In June, the New Statesman website recorded record traffic figures when more than four million unique users read more than 27 million pages. The circulation of the weekly magazine is growing steadily and now stands at 33,400, the highest it has been since the early 1980s.