Chart of the day: Facebook report

An unusual chart of the day, this one. What you are seeing is my friends – or at least the ones on Facebook. But anyone can make their own version of this chart.

Wolfram|Alpha, the "knowledge engine" which, amongst other things, powers Siri, Apple's voice control/digital assistant software, has introduced a new feature allowing users to analyse data taken from their Facebook accounts. The above image is my personal "friend network" showing, in the two large clusters in the centre, all my friends from my school and university days, and then dotted around the outside, various smaller groups from old jobs, social groups and family.

As well as revealing that some groups are alarmingly tightly-integrated with others – do that many people know my mum on Facebook?! – the charts also let you find out things about your friends in aggregate which you'd never know individually. Forget Tom, Dick and Harry; the most common first names amongst people I know are Tom, James and Alex (like attracts like?) with, apart from my family, Turner being the most common surname.

Some of the stats, though, aren't so reliable. While I was briefly shocked that over a fifth of my friends are married, I soon remembered that most of them set that status as a joke several years ago and never got round to changing it. I'm pretty sure I'm still down as single too (which I'm not – sorry, everybody). And I'm certain that James wasn't born in 1914, no matter what his profile says.

Try it yourself, and see what you can find.

A second chart, showing frequency and types of posts to Facebook. Photograph: Wolfram|Alpha

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

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Goldsmiths diversity officer Bahar Mustafa receives court summons in wake of “#KillAllWhiteMen” outcry

Mustafa will answer charges of "threatening" and "offensive/ indecent/ obscene/ menacing" communications.

In May this year, Bahar Mustafa, then diversity officer at Goldsmiths, University of London, posted a Facebook message requesting that men and white people not attend a BME Women and non-binary event. There was an immediate backlash from those also enraged by the fact that Mustafa allegedly used the hashtag #KillAllWhiteMen on social media. 

Today, Mustafa received a court summons from the Metropolitan Police to answer two charges, both of which come under the Malicious Communications Act 1988. The first is for sending a "letter/communication/article conveying a threatening message"; the second for "sending by public communication network an offensive/ indecent/ obsecene/ menacing message/ matter".

It isn't clear what communciation either charge relates to - one seems to refer to something sent in private, while the use of "public communication network" in the second implies that it took place on social media. The Met's press release states that both communciations took place between 10 November 2014 and 31 May 2015, a very broad timescale considering the uproar around Mustafa's social media posts took place in May. 

We approached the Met to ask which communications the summons refers to, but a spokesperson said that no more information could be released at this time. Mustafa will appear at Bromley Magistrates' Court on 5 November. 

Barbara Speed is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman and a staff writer at CityMetric.