Facebook introduces icons for same-sex marriage

The rollout happened quietly over the weekend

Facebook has introduced new icons for gay and lesbian couples who get married, quietly pushing out the change over the weekend. Previously, any users who set their status to "married" would get a happy husband and wife on their feed, regardless of the gender of the couple. But now, these users will be recognized by the new same-sex marriage icons.

The icons follow Facebook's addition of "in a civil partnership" to relationship options last year, and come in time for Facebook co-founder Chris Hughes to use one at the top of his own page following his wedding to husband Sean Eldridge on Saturday.

The move inevitably inspired protests from homophobic pressure groups, but also from groups who argued that the move is two steps forward but one step back - acknowledging and celebrating the role of gay and lesbian couples, while also reinforcing the traditional gender roles which can make life difficult for those very same people.

One comment below the GLAAD announcement of the change reads "My butch partner would not like being represented as someone in a dress. To put it mildly," while another pointed out that, while you can choose to hide gender from timelines, you are still forced to choose male or female when creating an account, saying "Fantastic! Now, can they add more options for gender for those of us that don't really fit?!".

Facebook co-founder Chris Hughes posts his marriage on the site. Photograph: Facebook/Chris Hughes

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

Joshua M. Jones for Emojipedia
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The emojis proposed for release in 2016 are faintly disturbing

Birds of prey, dead flowers and vomit: Emojipedia's vision for 2016. 

Since, as we're constantly being told, emojis are now the fastest growing languge in the UK, it seems only appropriate that its vocabulary should expand to include more commonly used images or ideas as its popularity increases. 

Next year, the Unicode Consortium, which decides which new codes can be added to the emoji dictionary, will approve a new round of symbols. So far, 38 suggestions have been accepted as candidates for the final selection. Emojipedia, an online emoji resource, has taken it upon itself to mock up the new symbols based on the appearance of existing emojis (though emojis are designed slightly differently by different operating systems like Apple or Android). The full list will be decided by Unicode in mid-2016. 

As it stands, the new selection is a little... well, dark. 

First, there are the faces: a Pinocchio-nosed lying face, a dribbling face, a nauseous face, an upset-looking lady and a horrible swollen clown head: 

Then there's what I like to call the "melancholy nighttime collection", including a bat, owl, fox, blackened heart and dying rose: 

Here we have a few predators, thrown in for good measure, and a stop sign:

There are a few symbols of optimism amid the doom and gloom, including a pair of crossed fingers, clinking champagne glasses and smiling cowboy, plus a groom and prince to round out the bride and princess on current release. (You can see the full list of mock-ups here). But overall, the tone is remarkably sombre. 

Perhaps as emoji become ever more popular as a method of communication, we need to accept that they must represent the world in all its darkness and nuance. Not every experience deserves a smiley face, after all. 

All mock-ups: Emojpedia.

Barbara Speed is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman and a staff writer at CityMetric.