Facebook introduces icons for same-sex marriage

The rollout happened quietly over the weekend

Facebook has introduced new icons for gay and lesbian couples who get married, quietly pushing out the change over the weekend. Previously, any users who set their status to "married" would get a happy husband and wife on their feed, regardless of the gender of the couple. But now, these users will be recognized by the new same-sex marriage icons.

The icons follow Facebook's addition of "in a civil partnership" to relationship options last year, and come in time for Facebook co-founder Chris Hughes to use one at the top of his own page following his wedding to husband Sean Eldridge on Saturday.

The move inevitably inspired protests from homophobic pressure groups, but also from groups who argued that the move is two steps forward but one step back - acknowledging and celebrating the role of gay and lesbian couples, while also reinforcing the traditional gender roles which can make life difficult for those very same people.

One comment below the GLAAD announcement of the change reads "My butch partner would not like being represented as someone in a dress. To put it mildly," while another pointed out that, while you can choose to hide gender from timelines, you are still forced to choose male or female when creating an account, saying "Fantastic! Now, can they add more options for gender for those of us that don't really fit?!".

Facebook co-founder Chris Hughes posts his marriage on the site. Photograph: Facebook/Chris Hughes

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

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Goldsmiths diversity officer Bahar Mustafa receives court summons in wake of “#KillAllWhiteMen” outcry

Mustafa will answer charges of "threatening" and "offensive/ indecent/ obscene/ menacing" communications.

In May this year, Bahar Mustafa, then diversity officer at Goldsmiths, University of London, posted a Facebook message requesting that men and white people not attend a BME Women and non-binary event. There was an immediate backlash from those also enraged by the fact that Mustafa allegedly used the hashtag #KillAllWhiteMen on social media. 

Today, Mustafa received a court summons from the Metropolitan Police to answer two charges, both of which come under the Communications Act 2003. The first is for sending a "letter/communication/article conveying a threatening message"; the second for "sending by public communication network an offensive/ indecent/ obsecene/ menacing message/ matter".

It isn't clear what communciation either charge relates to - one seems to refer to something sent in private, while the use of "public communication network" in the second implies that it took place on social media. The Met's press release states that both communciations took place between 10 November 2014 and 31 May 2015, a very broad timescale considering the uproar around Mustafa's social media posts took place in May. 

We approached the Met to ask which communications the summons refers to, but a spokesperson said that no more information could be released at this time. Mustafa will appear at Bromley Magistrates' Court on 5 November. 

Barbara Speed is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman and a staff writer at CityMetric.