Australian electronics retailer institutes "Internet Explorer tax"

Using IE7 will cost you 6.8 per cent more.

An Australian electronics retailer has decided to start charging customers who still use Internet Explorer 7, the five-year-old browser that is the default on machines running Windows Vista and peaked at 46 per cent of the browser market in 2008.

Kogan is instituting the "tax" at 0.1 per cent for every month IE7 has been released, meaning it currently stands at 6.8 per cent. Using the New Statesman's patented time machines (Windows XP computers), it appears that the plan has not yet been implemented, but the company says that when it is switched on, it will display the above message.

The company says:

It is early days yet, but we have had a lot of tweets and emails from people in the IT and web community praising us for what we have done. Anyone who is involved with the internet and web technology would know the amount of time that is wasted to support all these antiquated browsers. You have to make all these work-arounds all the time to make sure the site works properly on it.

They claim the key reason for doing so is the expense of continuing to support IE7:

We have not done the exact maths, but it is a significant amount. The front end of every screen has to get redeveloped every time in order to render properly in IE7. It's not only costing us a huge amount, it's affecting any business with an online presence, and costing the internet economy millions of dollars.

Kogan is no stranger to unusual pricing. In 2010, they rolled out "LivePrice", which let people pay less the earlier in the production process they ordered a new product.

The tax, from the, um, "Department of Internet Justice"

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

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Why did Julian Assange lose his internet connection?

Rumours of paedophilia have obscured the real reason the WikiLeaks founder has been cut off from the internet. 

In the most newsworthy example of "My house, my rules" this year, Julian Assange's dad (the Ecuadorian embassy in London) has cut off his internet because he's been a bad boy. 

Rumours that the WikiLeaks' founder was WiFi-less were confirmed by Ecuador's foreign ministry late last night, which released a statement saying it has "temporarily restricted access to part of its communications systems in its UK Embassy" where Assange has been granted asylum for the last four years. 

Claims that the embassy disconnected Assange because he had sent sexually explicit messages to an eight-year-old girl —first reported by the US political blog Daily Kos — have been quashed. Wikileaks responded by denying the claims on Twitter, as Ecuador explained the move was taken to prevent Assange's interference with the US election. The decision follows the publication of leaked emails from Hillary Clinton's campaign adviser John Podesta, as well as emails from the Democratic National Committee (DNC), by WikiLeaks.

Ecuador "respects the principle of non-intervention in the internal affairs of other states," read the statement, though the embassy have confirmed they will continue to grant Assange asylum. 

Assange first arrived at the Ecuadorian embassy in London in June 2012, after being sought for questioning in Sweden over an allegation of rape, which he denies. WikiLeaks claims this new accusation is a further attempt to frame Assange.  "An unknown entity posing as an internet dating agency prepared an elaborate plot to falsely claim that Julian Assange received US$1M from the Russian government and a second plot to frame him sexually molesting an eight year old girl," reads a news story on the official site.

It is unclear when Assange will be reconnected, although it will presumably be after the US presidential election on 8 November.

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.