Harman blames economic crisis for failure to oust Brown

"Leadership crisis" in middle of "economic crisis" would have been wrong

Gordon Brown could not be forced out of office during the "coup" attempt in January because of the "grave economic situation" and his determination to stay in power, Harriet Harman has said.

In an interview to be published in tomorrow's New Statesman, Harman, the acting Labour leader, is asked why she did not tell Brown to go during a one to one meeting with him during the "coup that never was", which was led by Geoff Hoon, Patricia Hewitt and Charles Clarke and exclusively revealed first by this blog. Harman replies:

There are three overriding things there. First is that the country was still in the middle of a grave economic situation and to have a leadership crisis in the middle of government, in the middle of people worrying about whether their jobs are going to go . . .So, there's a huge economic crisis. The second thing was that, because of that, there was no general view in the party that Gordon needed to be pushed out of office. And third, Gordon was very determined to take his responsibilities as prime minister seriously and see the country through the recession.

For the full version of the wide ranging interview, see the magazine out tomorrow or Newstatesman.com in due course.

 

James Macintyre is political correspondent for the New Statesman.
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Cabinet audit: what does the appointment of Liam Fox as International Trade Secretary mean for policy?

The political and policy-based implications of the new Secretary of State for International Trade.

Only Nixon, it is said, could have gone to China. Only a politician with the impeccable Commie-bashing credentials of the 37th President had the political capital necessary to strike a deal with the People’s Republic of China.

Theresa May’s great hope is that only Liam Fox, the newly-installed Secretary of State for International Trade, has the Euro-bashing credentials to break the news to the Brexiteers that a deal between a post-Leave United Kingdom and China might be somewhat harder to negotiate than Vote Leave suggested.

The biggest item on the agenda: striking a deal that allows Britain to stay in the single market. Elsewhere, Fox should use his political capital with the Conservative right to wait longer to sign deals than a Remainer would have to, to avoid the United Kingdom being caught in a series of bad deals. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. He usually writes about politics.